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Dublin: 1 °C Wednesday 26 November, 2014

Map, table: Ireland’s 16,881 vacant homes

Ireland’s problems with unfinished housing developments have improved but new figures from the National Housing Development Survey outline just how many vacant dwellings there are and where the problem is worst.

THE DEPARTMENT OF Environment has released a new document which outlines the current state of unfinished housing developments in Ireland.

Though the new numbers show that the number of unfinished housing estates has fallen from over 2,800 two years ago to 1,77o this year the number of houses that remain vacant stands at 16,881.

Furthermore, according to the National Housing Development Survey, there are 1,770 developments which are incomplete and approximately 1,100 developments are said to be in a “seriously problematic condition”.

This table shows where the problem is worst with Leitrim, Longford, Cavan, Sligo, and Roscommon – which all border each other - topping the list:

Click here to see this table more clearly if viewing on a mobile device

Then there is this map which colour-codes where the problem is worst with the reddest portions of the map highlighting the worst affected parts of the country:

Click here to see this map more clearly if viewing on a mobile device

Speaking after the release of the report yesterday, Minister of State for Housing and Planning Jan O’Sullivan said that while the study showed “quantifiable progress” she was “keenly aware” of the hundreds of families still enduring “the stress and strain of living on an unfinished development”.

She said: “Recent experience has demonstrated how a realistic approach to estate completion involving all stakeholders can deliver results.  I expect that approach will go a long way to resolving difficulties on the vast majority of remaining unfinished developments.

However, it must also be recognised that some of these developments are commercially unviable due to location, demand and build quality.  The most prudent course of action in relation to these developments from a public safety, planning and commercial perspective is to seek the agreement of owners/funders to clear the site and return it to some beneficial use.

“My Department will be working with stakeholders to develop a response in relation to this issue over the coming months with a view to having a plan in place by the end of Spring 2013.

Read: NAMA says it will give 2,000 homes for social housing. So far: there’s just 58

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