This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 10 °C Wednesday 17 October, 2018
Advertisement

WATCH: The aftermath of a teenager's Ebola death

A suspicion of vaccines and stigma around Ebola can have devastating affects.

Image: AP/Press Association Images

IRISH NGO WORLD Vision Ireland will be working on vaccinating people against Ebola in West Africa.

It will work on the ground to “build trust amongst communities for the vaccine and to dispel misconceptions about the Ebola virus and the vaccine itself”.

Helen Keogh, Chief Executive of World Vision Ireland, explained:

The stigma surrounding Ebola, coupled with a suspicion of vaccines in general, may deter people from getting vaccinated. World Vision Ireland, along with its partners, will develop a communication strategy and tools to promote the acceptance and uptake of new Ebola vaccines.

The NGO will train community leaders, including faith leaders, in using the correct scientific knowledge when discussing Ebola and the vaccination with their communities.

It will also work on a reminders being sent using mobile phones to people about receiving booster jabs.

World Vision Ireland was chosen by Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) to support this Ebola+ Vaccine programme.

The ongoing Ebola outbreak in western Africa has killed over 8000 people so far.

An Ebola funeral

Meanwhile, Plan Ireland has released this footage of the aftermath of a teenager’s death of Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The teenage boy’s friend, Tyson Conteh, recites the poem Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep, as footage shows how upset people are over the death of the young person.

Footage may be distressing to some readers.

Source: PlanIreland/YouTube

Read: After a fortnight in isolation, good news for UK Ebola patient>

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

Read next:

COMMENTS (40)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel