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Dublin: 8 °C Sunday 21 December, 2014

Comment #1223590 by Dermot Ryan

Dermot Ryan May 21 6:23 PM #

yes you need a licence it stems from the Derrynaflan hoard years ago when the chalice got a fair ould hammering while it was being taken out of the ground; further explanation below !

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Read the article where this comment appeared:

Dead treasure hunter’s loot of 899 artefacts returned to Irish museum

Dead treasure hunter’s loot of 899 artefacts returned to Irish museum

The items came to light following a tip-off from the British Museum to the National Museum of Ireland.

Comment thread:

  • Shane King May 21 6:05 PM #

    What’s the reason for needing a licence to own and use a metal detector??

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    • Hugo Sanchez May 21 6:14 PM #

      Do you need a licence?

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    • Dermot Ryan May 21 6:23 PM #

      yes you need a licence it stems from the Derrynaflan hoard years ago when the chalice got a fair ould hammering while it was being taken out of the ground; further explanation below !

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    • Chris Coffey May 21 10:04 PM #

      Its a means of protecting the fragile nature of the archaeological record of this country. We need only look to the UK to see the rampant destruction that is being carried out by amateur enthusiasts due to the legal and largely encouraged practice of metal detectoring.

      Far more important then finding an object is finding in properly, i.e recording it completely before it even comes out of the ground. It is the contextual record of the find that is most important, otherwise it is meaningless, its ability to elucidate has been lost.

      Furthermore a metal detector, quite obviously, only locates metal. That is obviously fine for “treasure hunters” but it is far from fine for the archaeological community who are not only losing part of the record in the form of said metal, but associated non-metal artefacts, along with the site itself are being destroyed in the process.

      The answer to your question Shane is simply that the benefits of outright banning MD’s far outweighs the benefits of keeping them, and in doing so Ireland is leading the way in heritage legislation (for the most part)

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    • Donncha Cronin May 23 12:09 PM #

      No, you don’t need a licence PROVIDED that detecting does not take place in an area of archeological significance AND that you are not looking for archeological items AND that you have the consent of the landowner. This is a bit daft as in the event you do find such an item in a non heritage area you need to prove somehow you weren’t looking for it.

      The Derrynaflan hoard was found in an archelogically significant area, they shouldn’t have been in there in the first place.

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