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Comment #4916344 by Super3000

Super3000 Mar 25th 2016, 8:28 PM #

It’s difficult for a state to legitimize one act of terror whilst condemning others. Whether those other attacks happened to occur in Belfast, Monaghan, Brussels or Paris, it still makes for a great display of hypocrisy when they have to deal with the foundation myth that’s been handed down to them, namely: that a majority of people wanted independence and that the lives of Irish people were in some way improved as a result of it.

The first part is easily disproved: in 1918 over 50% voted for parties in favour of either home rule or union with Britain. And the second part: people realised that their only chance of improving their lives was to leave and so mass emigration has been one of the consistent features of Irish life for generations now.

It would maybe have been better to live with Britain as live in it.

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Activists draw over John Redmond's face on controversial College Green banner

Activists draw over John Redmond's face on controversial College Green banner

Irish language group Misneach said it defaced the banner in a protest against “revisionist propaganda”.

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    Favourite PaulJ
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    Mar 25th 2016, 8:39 PM

    You forgot to mention that a generation previous, in a five year period our population dropped by nearly 50% between deaths and emigration, under British rule. Yeah maybe we were better off with them eh??

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    Favourite Super3000
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    Mar 25th 2016, 9:02 PM

    I’ll not be pedantic but the 1840s was not the previous generation to that of the 1920s. What was, though, was the generation that lived through the 1880 famine. This is the lesser known one that is rarely discussed because it’s the one where the British acted promptly, the one where the lessons of the previous famine were put to use, the one that -had Ireland been independent- could have caused more deaths and the one that seems to contradict the more politically useful narrative of an Gorta Mór.

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