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Dublin: 10 °C Sunday 22 April, 2018
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International Women's Day 2018: Here's what Irish women need

IWD is an important moment to look to the changes we need to make for women’s equality, writes Orla O’Connor.

36 hours alone in a bed without so much as a hot drink: lessons to be learned from Storm Emma

The emergency effort co-ordinated by the NECC was impressive, writes Tom Clonan, but there is still a learning curve in reaching out to all vulnerable people.

Female Indian doctor attacked and Nigerian UCD student lost eye: Ireland's unwelcoming 1960s

Evidence of racism is taken less seriously now than during the early 1960s, writes Bryan Fanning.

'At a time such as Storm Emma we can feel the emptiness of endless time without boundaries'

We gave little thought to the psychological and emotional stresses of Storm Emma’s enforced isolation, writes Stephanie Regan.

'I started using a wheelchair at 18 and instantly became isolated but I just want to be wanted, like everybody else'

‘People get tired of the fact that I live with my physical issues every day as if it’s a burden for them’, writes Niamh Ni Ruari.

Kildare man at Harvard Law: 'Days before my 24th birthday, I was told I had 6 months to live'

Michael Mullen had beaten cancer twice before when he received his third diagnosis just four months into his masters in Boston.

America’s gun culture: What makes Americans so attached to their weapons?

After opening their session with a prayer for the 17 young Floridians recently killed, state legislators then overwhelmingly rejected a ban on semi-automatic guns.

If there's no toilet around, is having a sneaky wee down a lane really a big deal?

When you gotta go, do you really have to go?

'Gardening can be a major turn off for people but food growing is not about gardening, it’s about food'

“It’s been a particular bugbear of mine for years that food growing is always presented as a gardening thing”, writes Michael Kelly.

Candid recordings of female doctor from field hospital in East Ghouta

“As I’m talking, there are rockets falling on Ghouta.”

'There's an element of a lottery in the Irish criminal justice system, we need sentencing guidelines'

Sentencing guidelines operate with remarkable clarity and simplicity for England and Wales, why not here?

From making bread to feeding birds - these are your comments on the weather

“I have bread to make breadballs for the kids to throw in the morning.”

30 hours on a trolley in Kerry: 'I witnessed an elderly woman being shielded with towels by relatives'

John Paul O’Connor says he was shocked by what he witnessed at University Hospital Kerry last week.

Disposable fashion and take-away coffee cups: Are you part of the throwaway culture?

We need to take back our consumer power and start talking about the impact our throwaway culture is having on the planet, writes Sundara O’Higgins.

'Militant, hard-liners or Nazis' - How those challenging the status quo are labelled

Language is used in a manipulative way to make one side of the debate seem practical and free of ideological bias and the other side as completely unreasonable.

'We've fostered 15 children, in the beginning I thought we were going to save the world'

“The most rewarding thing about fostering is seeing the potential in children that was sometimes overlooked when they were younger.”

The most common foods we throw out and how to keep them fresher for longer

Making sure to correctly store and prepare our food means that when life gets in the way, our food can get another chance, writes Odile Le Bolloch.

Expert advice on what to say to a friend or colleague who is recently bereaved

There are a number of things that we can do that can make a difference, writes Breffni McGuinness from the Irish Hospice Foundation.

Is staying on top of the news important? One married couple give polar opposite views

Are we constantly bombarded with details we don’t need to know about? Or are we more informed and educated than ever before?

A single tomato plant can produce 200 tomatoes in a season, here's how to sow them GIY

A single tomato plant can produce 200 tomatoes in a season, here's how to sow them

There is simply nothing like a home-grown tomato, writes GIY guru Michael Kelly.

'We feel we deserve everything and equate happiness to things, so I gave up shopping for a year'

Lisa Regan decided to give up shopping for a year and says the experience was priceless.

How arming teachers would increase the risk of school shootings, not prevent them

“The US President’s big idea, straight from the NRA’s playbook, is also a sinister one.”

'Walls to stop immigrants would have made my own existence impossible'

“I have always considered myself as a world citizen: Tamil by ethnicity, German by heart, Dutch by fondness, Irish by spirit, Italian by love.”

Dublin councillor with MS: 'I was on a walking stick at 32 ... now I plan to run the marathon'

Mark Wards writes about his journey from crippling depression to running the Dublin City Marathon for MS awareness.

'The hysterical reaction on social media if the majority opinion isn't agreed with is ridiculous'

It’s a waste of calories getting into some meaningless argument with a whiny millennial about how you’re a racist or a sexist for not liking a certain film, writes Ethan Shattock.

'We've paid back €90,000 on a €30,000 loan but we're still battling to keep our home'

‘Irish courts are not fully applying EU requirements that have become our lifeline.’

'At 32, I was told I had breast cancer just seven months after having my first baby'

We’re all familiar with the expression ‘life can change in an instant’, now it makes complete sense, writes Georgie Crawford.

Growing up in the Troubles: 'I remember showing a plastic bullet to my Mum to excuse my lateness'

Shauneen Armstrong writes how Derry Girls shows what it was like for her and her friends growing up in Northern Ireland.

'How to sort out your affairs so loved ones won't have embarrassing memories of you after you die'

“It’s a lovely way to reminisce on years past while also letting go of a few painful memories.”

Dublin in the 80s - 'Instead of an 18th birthday card, given a birth cert and told to sign on'

“I remember the city being a pretty run down, neglected, grey place”, writes Anthony Goulding.

Use remaining old-season veg and store cupboard ingredients for a delicious cassoulet

This week Michael Kelly has tips on making your own compost.

'There's a deep-rooted hatred toward the indigenous culture of Ireland, above all its language'

When Northern Ireland was formed, unionist were determined to kill off the Gaeltacht communities, writes Caoimhín De Barra.

'Let's be accurate: There's no proposal to bring in new interviews in Irish for Gaelscoils'

‘The policy affects the allocation of less than 1% of places in Gaelscoileanna but is of vital importance to the minority of native speakers involved’, writes Colmán Ó’Drisceoil.

'I live in enduring, constant severe pain - Versatis patches made things bearable'

I’m sick of the medical ‘power and control’ that give us little choice and expect us to suffer, writes Margaret Kennedy.

Do you know where the adverts on your phone about the Eighth Amendment are coming from?

Every impression designed to appeal to the emotions of its audience is gold in the coffers of the advertising platforms, writes Davis Morrison.

Why are more and more Irish charities not publishing their financial information?

‘How can charities ask us to trust them more, when they tell us less?’, writes Patricia Quinn.

'If I miss my meds, it's a matter of hours before I have a seizure': Rick O'Shea on life with epilepsy

The RTE broadcaster had his first seizure aged 16.

'Raped women are forced to marry their rapists to maintain their family's name'

Jenifer Williams lives in Dublin but grew up in the Congo, she described it as “a ground of no mercy”.

Ruby Tandoh: 'Food fads are toxic - they erode the faith you have in your appetite'

Former Great British Bake-off contestant Ruby Tandoh has written a book that’s an antidote to stress and pressure over food and eating. She says: eat up and enjoy your food.

Why are oversubscribed Educate Together schools only taking half-stream?

If the divestment process is to be meaningful, schools must be allowed to grow to full stream intake if the demand is there, writes Ronan Moore.