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Dublin: 12 °C Thursday 19 July, 2018
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Ireland plans to ban sale of new cars with tailpipes by 2030

The government are also exploring ways of reducing cigarette butt litter.

THE GOVERNMENT HAS pledged to ban the sale of new cars with tailpipes by the year 2030, as part of its commitment to environment issues.

Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment Denis Naughten said that he told his European counterparts at a European Council meeting this week that Ireland “had set itself an objective” to ban the sale of all new cars with a tailpipe by 2030.

But he said that in order to do that, the European automotive industry needed to ramp up its efforts to reduce emissions and produce zero emissions cars.

“They really need to drive ambition in this area so that we can reduce overall carbon emissions within the transport sector that make up one quarter of all carbon emissions within the EU.”

There are widespread plans to ensure there are zero-emission vehicles on roads. Alternative fuel options are being looked at to introduce green-energy fleets for Dublin Bus, Bus Éireann and school buses.

Ireland could be forced to pay up to €75 million each year if it doesn’t meet its EU renewable-energy targets by 2020 – with many experts and politicians saying it won’t meet those targets.

Cigarette butts

shutterstock_295016384 Source: Shutterstock/Panya Anakotmankong

Naughten also discussed how to tackle cigarette butt litter with his European counterparts.

Every single cigarette butt has 12,000 micro strands of plastic in it. As a result on a global level, we have 1,900 million strands of plastic going into our water streams every single second.

“And it’s not just a problem of microplastics getting into our waters, also the cigarette filters themselves are there to block tar and other chemicals going into the smoker’s lungs.

“But they end up in our water courses, in our rivers having an impact on aquatic life, and in our fish stocks.”

The 2017 National Litter Pollution Report showed that half of all street litter is made up of cigarette butts. It’s understood that on-the-spot litter fines are going to be increased from €150 to €250 in an attempt to tackle the problem.

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