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Dublin: 16 °C Tuesday 18 June, 2019
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'We were so lucky that day': Nurse who saved Dublin Bus driver helps launch nationwide CPR training

The Irish Heart Foundation aims to train as many as 100,000 people within two years.

Source: TheJournal.ie/YouTube

THE NURSE WHO stepped in to save the life of a Dublin Bus driver who suffered a heart attack while driving hopes her story will encourage more people to learn CPR.

Aoife McGivney was speaking at the launch of a new campaign by the Irish Heart Foundation, which aims to train as many as 100,000 people over the next two years in vital life-saving skills – and all for free.

The programme, Hands For Life, will take place in community centres, clubs and libraries.

McGivney said that while she benefited from her own medical training – as well as by switching into “nurse-mode” when passengers realised something was wrong – it’s important that people learn how easy it is to provide simple first aid in a similar situation.

The Irish Heart Foundation’s guidelines for CPR are:

  1. If you see a person suddenly collapse, check for a response. Call their name and shake them gently on the shoulder.
  2. If there is no response call 112 or 999 immediately to get help on the way.
  3. If the person is still not responding and is not breathing normally, then make sure the person is lying flat on their back on the ground. Kneel close beside them and place your two hands on the centre of their chest in line with their nipples, one on top of the other, and keep your arms straight.
  4. Start compressions. Push hard and fast. Push down at least five centimetres or two inches and push at a rate of 100-120 beats per minute. The Bee Gees song ‘Stayin’ Alive’ is the perfect CPR rhythm. Keep going until the emergency services arrive.

Watch the video above for our full report.

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Nicky Ryan

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