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Dublin: 13 °C Tuesday 11 August, 2020

#factcheck

# factcheck - Saturday 9 May, 2020

Debunked: TheJournal.ie and other outlets are not organising a 'clap for our government' tonight

A fake image on social media claims that media organisations and Fine Gael are calling for people to applaud the government tonight.

# factcheck - Thursday 7 May, 2020

Debunked: No, Ireland's golf courses did not reopen on Saturday

A letter claiming to be from Golf Union Ireland stated golf courses were set to reopen on 2 May.

# factcheck - Wednesday 6 May, 2020

Debunked: No, this video does not show people having a 'street party' in Dublin last week

A post shared on Facebook claims to show a party taking place in Dublin on 1 May, but the footage is older than that.

# factcheck - Tuesday 5 May, 2020

Debunked: No, the British army is not setting up a 'military camp' at Long Kesh prison

A post on Facebook claims that the British army are to set up a ‘military camp’ at the site of the former Maze Prison.

# factcheck - Saturday 2 May, 2020

Debunked: No, postural drainage is not an 'easy' way to treat Covid-19 pneumonia

The HSE said routine breathing tests and mobilising are more appropriate for Covid-19 patients than this method.

# factcheck - Thursday 30 April, 2020

Debunked: No, researchers did not 'invent' the coronavirus in 2015

Posts speculating about the origin of the virus have been widely shared in recent weeks.

# factcheck - Wednesday 29 April, 2020

Debunked: No, this footage does not show NPHET members ignoring social distancing

An image was widely shared on social media after file footage appeared on RTÉ news bulletins.

Debunked: No, this message from a Covid-19 app asking why a person is 20km from home is not real

The false message originated in Australia but is being widely shared here.

# factcheck - Tuesday 28 April, 2020

Not enough is being done to label fake news on social media sites - report

FuJo Director Jane Suiter said that the “most significant shortcoming of empowering consumers” was labelling trustworthy content.

Debunked: No, this image does not show an official government announcement about the lifting of restrictions

This image has been shared widely on WhatsApp recently.

# factcheck - Thursday 23 April, 2020

Debunked: No, there wasn't a vaccine for Covid-19 back in 2001

A piece of misinformation being shared widely claims that a vaccine existed 19 years ago. This is untrue.

Debunked: No, Donald Trump didn't tweet he'd 'never let thousands die' in a pandemic back in 2009

The US President says lots of things. But he didn’t say this.

# factcheck - Wednesday 22 April, 2020

Debunked: No, WhatsApp isn't about to start charging users to send messages

A message circulating WhatsApp claims that the platform is going to start charging users from “Saturday morning”.

# factcheck - Saturday 18 April, 2020

Debunked: Is 2020 really a 'normal' year for deaths from respiratory illnesses?

A post on Facebook claims there are no more deaths ‘than usual’ as a result of Covid-19.

# factcheck - Friday 17 April, 2020

Debunked: No, this is not a picture of Bulgarian workers outside a supermarket in Dublin this week

The photo has been widely shared on social media and messaging services.

Debunked: No, Queen Elizabeth's coronavirus speech was not recorded on 5 March

A post on Facebook claiming that Queen Elizabeth’s speech regarding the coronavirus outbreak is untrue.

# factcheck - Thursday 16 April, 2020

Debunked: There's no evidence that criminals are dousing facemasks with chemicals so they can rob people

The false message has been shared across Facebook and WhatsApp in Ireland and other countries.

# factcheck - Wednesday 15 April, 2020

Debunked: No, this isn't a 'tentative' list of dates the government might start letting things reopen

This message has been circulating today in WhatsApp Groups – the Chief Medical Officer says “no such list exists” right now.

Debunked: No, watered-down mouthwash is not an effective substitute for hand sanitiser

It is also not an effective surface disinfectant.

# factcheck - Tuesday 14 April, 2020

Debunked: No, there is not enough evidence that a malaria drug and an antibiotic can lead to a quick recovery from Covid-19

Donald Trump has said this combination could be “one of the biggest game changers in the history of medicine”.

# factcheck - Saturday 11 April, 2020

Debunked: This message advising people to 'get tested' is not from the HSE's contact tracing team

Recipients are advised not to click on the link attached to the message.

# factcheck - Thursday 9 April, 2020

Debunked: A video called 'move your cucu' will not format your phone, but people still advised to be wary of scams

The WhatsApp message is reminiscent of a previous hoax text in 2015.

# factcheck - Sunday 5 April, 2020

# factcheck - Saturday 4 April, 2020

Debunked: No, Queen Elizabeth has not been diagnosed with coronavirus

A post on Instagram claiming that Queen Elizabeth has coronavirus is untrue.

Spot any potentially false posts on Facebook? Let us know and we'll factcheck them

TheJournal.ie is debunking some of the many rumours going around about coronavirus.

# factcheck - Friday 3 April, 2020

Debunked: The risk of carrying coronavirus into your home on your shoes is extremely low

Could you carry coronavirus into your home on your shoes? It’s low risk.

Debunked: No, this 'very urgent' message telling you that your bank details can be robbed by making a phone call isn't true

The latest WhatsApp message doing the rounds is debunked here.

# factcheck - Wednesday 1 April, 2020

Debunked: That WhatsApp message about a 'strict ban on alcohol' from tomorrow is, at best, an April Fool's joke

The image claims that there will be “a strict ban of alcohol” from tomorrow, meaning that off-licences would close.

Debunked: No, Leo Varadkar is not telling people to avoid using the Houseparty video messaging app

An image purporting to show the Taoiseach warning people not to use the app has been shared on social media in recent days.

Debunked: Yes, funerals are very different right now but they are still happening

Debunked: Yes, funerals are very different right now but they are still happening

A message being shared makes specific claims about funeral arrangements for loved ones who die from Covid-19.

# factcheck - Tuesday 31 March, 2020

Debunked: No, the army isn't patrolling all the cities, towns and villages in Ireland because of Covid-19

There is a lot of misinformation about what is actually involved in Ireland’s Covid-19 measures.

Debunked: No, leaving onions around your home won't 'catch' the coronavirus

False claims on Facebook suggest that onions are able to absorb germs.

# factcheck - Monday 30 March, 2020

Debunked: That WhatsApp message with health tips from a doctor in China is false and misleading

A message claiming to be from a friend’s uncle who works in a hospital in China has been circulating lately.

# factcheck - Thursday 26 March, 2020

Debunked: No, drinking tea is not a cure for Covid-19

False claims being shared on WhatsApp claim that drinking tea can stop the coronavirus.

Debunked: The UK no longer considers Covid-19 a high consequence infectious disease, but social media posts about it are misleading

A screenshot shared online is true, but doesn’t tell the full story.

# factcheck - Wednesday 25 March, 2020

Debunked: No, Ireland is not in a 'lockdown sequence' despite what this Facebook post says

The post claims the Irish government has been slowly implementing a country-wide lockdown since last Sunday.

Debunked: No, GPs aren't giving out 'rescue packs' en masse to asthma and COPD sufferers

A message that is being shared in WhatsApp groups and on social media contains medical advice that is “not safe” according to one GP.