Skip to content

Readers like you keep news free for everyone.

More than 5,000 readers have already pitched in to keep free access to The Journal.

For the price of one cup of coffee each week you can help keep paywalls away.

Michael Martin celebrates being elected the new leader of Fianna Fail in 2011.
Michael Martin celebrates being elected the new leader of Fianna Fail in 2011.
Image: Mark Stedman/Photocall Ireland

Fianna Fáil back on top in new opinion poll

This is the second opinion poll in the last two weeks that has seen Fianna Fáil rise to the top.
Feb 17th 2013, 10:57 AM 14,341 232

FIANNA FÁIL HAS topped a second opinon poll, reaffirming its new position as the most popular political party in Ireland.

The Millward Brown Poll, published in the Sunday Independent today puts the party at 27 per cent, ahead of Fine Gael on 25 per cent and Labour on 13 per cent.

Sinn Féin regained its standing after a two point drop in last weekend’s poll, now on 20 per cent and 14 per cent of those polled supported ‘Others’.

Last week’s poll, which saw Fianna Fáil rise to the top again after less than two years out of government, was questioned as it was conducted around the time of the Magdalene report and before the promissory note deal. However today’s poll, the first taken after the deal, puts the party another point ahead of Fine Gael.

With Sinn Féin on 20 per cent, if these results are seen in the next general election, the two parties could form a coalition.

Speaking to TheJournal.ie earlier this week, Fianna Fáil leader Michael Martin said sharing power was not on his horizon but that he was “not ruling anything out”.

Making a difference

A mix of advertising and supporting contributions helps keep paywalls away from valuable information like this article.

Over 5,000 readers like you have already stepped up and support us with a monthly payment or a once-off donation.

For the price of one cup of coffee each week you can make sure we can keep reliable, meaningful news open to everyone regardless of their ability to pay.

“We don’t bring in people from outside of the government, there’s no change to the electoral system,” he said. “So people are rightly sort of disillusioned with the lack of any radical political reform.”

Send a tip to the author

Michelle Hennessy

COMMENTS (232)

    Back to top