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Dave Thompson/PA Wire
Manchester

Fifth person dies in Manchester hospital in connection with poisoned saline

A nurse is being questioned by police in connection with the deaths. With five now dead it’s feared that the toll will rise.

A FIFTH PERSON has now died at the Stepping Hill hospital in Manchester, where it’s suspected patients were poisoned after their saline drips were contaminated with insulin.

Nurse Rebecca Leighton, 27, was arrested at her home on Wednesday in connection with the deaths, and she can be held until just after 9pm tonight reports the BBC.

Three men and two women have now died as result of poisoning with insulin, which fatally lowered their blood sugar levels. Thirty-six containers of saline were found in a storeroom, all contaminated with insulin. Sky News reports that an internal audit carried out earlier this year found that a third of drugs were not properly stored in locked units.

A 41-year-old man remains in a critical condition in hospital. Eighty-three year old Alfred Derek Weaver is the latest person to have died in connection with the insulin poisoning and it’s reported that the treatment of a number of other patients is also being examined.

BBC reports that police in Manchester feel that it is likely that they will be asked to investigate further arrests. According to the Independent there have been a more suspicious deaths on the two wards in question.

The family of Alfred Derek Weaver have paid tribute to him…

Earlier: Fourth person dies at UK hospital as nurse is arrested>

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