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#HSE Fail

# hse-fail - Monday 16 August, 2010

WAITING 24 hours for a bed is not a thing of the past according to figures released by the HSE.

The daily “census” which records how many patients have been waiting for admission to a hospital ward each day at 2pm, shows that in 3% of cases patients wait more than 24 hours for a bed.

The figures also reveal that 39% of patients waited between 12 and 24 hours and 21% waited between six and 12 hours to be admitted.

Connolly Hospital is the only hospital in the country to have patients waiting more than 24 hours to be admitted to a ward after turning up at the emergency department.

Seven hospitals had patients waiting between six and 12 hours to be admitted, Roscommon Hospital, Our Lady’s in Navan, the Adelaide and Meath, the Mercy in Cork and Dublin’s Mater, Beaumont and Connolly hospitals.

The HSE maintains that “the vast majority of patients admitted from the Emergency Department do not wait for admission”. They say that 52% don’t wait at all for admission.

The news comes just as Dr James Reilly revealed that almost 18,000 surgeries were cancelled last year.

ELECTRICIAN’S at St James’ Hospital in Dublin are staking a one-day strike today.

The dispute centres around management’s attempts to transfer the responsibility to reset fire alarms at the hospital from electricians to employees of a private security firm.

The hospital says it would save money by doing so, as electricians are currently paid for four to eight hours to simply reset an alarm.

Management at the hospital said “‘Security personnel have traditionally been part of the hospital fire response team and are now engaged in the resetting of fire alarms for which they have been appropriately trained to the satisfaction of experts on fire services management.”

Talks between management and the Union, the TEEU broke down last week. The TEEU have already had two half day stoppages.

# hse-fail - Wednesday 11 August, 2010

THE PSYCHIATRIC NURSES’ ASSOCIATION (PNA) claims that mental health services in Ireland are in ‘freefall’ with 20% of nurses retiring from the HSE over the past two years.

The association says that almost 600 nurses retires last year many due to stress and assaults from patients. The association also says that a further 250 are set to retire next year.

PNA General Secretary Des Kavanagh said that levels of violence are unprecedented. ‘Bouncers’ and security firms were being hired to provide ‘secure care’ due to the lack of nurse.

Kavanagh told RTE that gardaí in riot year were called to a number of hospitals last year. Only last week he said a patient in Tallaght set fire to the unit, another patient broke through the ceiling in a unit and wrapped himself in electrical wire.

Kavangh said there are now a large number of vacancies in the HSE. Kavanagh said that an exemption in the recruitment moratorium in the HSE only allows for 100 new nurses to be hired despite the large exodus.