This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 9 °C Wednesday 20 November, 2019
Advertisement

Integrated ticket for Dublin transport to be introduced 'within weeks'

The National Transport Authority is looking for 500 volunteers to test out the long-awaited ticket before it is officially rolled out for the whole city.

NTA chief Gerry Murphy and junior minister for Public and Commuter Transport Alan Kelly with the Leap card
NTA chief Gerry Murphy and junior minister for Public and Commuter Transport Alan Kelly with the Leap card
Image: Sam Boal/Photocall Ireland

THE LONG-AWAITED INTEGRATED ticket for public transport in Dublin is due to be introduced ‘within weeks’, the Minister for Public Transport has announced.

The new ticket – called the Leap Card – will be for use on all Luas, Dart and Dublin Bus services and all Short Hop Irish Rail services in the Greater Dublin Area.

As part of the rollout of the scheme, the National Transport Authority is calling for 500 customers to sign up to help test the final phase of the ticketing system. Volunteers who sign up via the new ticketing system’s website – which will be open to applications from Friday - will receive a free €20 topped-up card to use on public transport around the city.

Unveiling the Leap Card this morning, Minister for Public Transport Alan Kelly TD said the card would be a “positive” step for commuters in Dublin city and encouraged people to sign up as goodwill ambassadors to test the scheme.

“Once we get feedback from users, the card will be introduced for wider public within a matter of weeks,” said Kelly, adding, “It is one of my top priorities as Minister”.

Customers will begin to see the rollout of Leap Card labels on machines and in Payzone shops across the city from today.

The ticket has been a long time in gestation. An integrated ticket for the city was first put forward in 1999 by then-Minister for Public Enterprise Mary O’Rourke who launched a project to examine its feasibility. Five successive ministers for transport promised rapid implementation of the ticket but with no tangible results.

The National Transport Authority took over implementation of the scheme from the Department of Transport earlier this year.

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

Read next:

COMMENTS (29)