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Dublin: 3 °C Thursday 14 November, 2019

#Language

# language - Friday 2 November, 2012

Elephant in South Korean zoo imitates human speech Chatty This post contains videos

Elephant in South Korean zoo imitates human speech

Koshik the 22-year-old Asian elephant tucks his trunk inside his mouth to mimick human speech, scientists say.

# language - Sunday 14 October, 2012

From The42 'Ah here, leave it out' - spoof video of Ireland-Germany game created LOL This post contains videos

'Ah here, leave it out' - spoof video of Ireland-Germany game created

Irish football fans at last have a reason to be cheerful, thanks to this hilarious parody.

# language - Tuesday 2 October, 2012

¡Hola! President Higgins begins official visit to South America today

The President will meet with the presidents of Chile, Brazil and Argentina during the two-week visit.

# language - Sunday 9 September, 2012

From The Daily Edge 7 words we should definitely have in English... Logophile This post contains images

7 words we should definitely have in English...

.. but don’t.

# language - Tuesday 4 September, 2012

Thailand clarifies position on English language teachers from Ireland ESL

Thailand clarifies position on English language teachers from Ireland

The Teachers’ Council of Thailand has clarified that Irish citizens are not required to prove their proficiency in English through testing before being allowed to teach in the country.

# language - Tuesday 28 August, 2012

Irish citizens not recognised as 'native' English speakers in Thailand ESL

Irish citizens not recognised as 'native' English speakers in Thailand

Citizens from the Republic will have to take a test to prove they can speak English in order to teach the language in Thailand.

# language - Monday 27 August, 2012

¿Lo entiendes? Michael D enrols in Spanish language course

The Irish President has spent the past three weeks learning Spanish with his wife Sabina.

# language - Wednesday 8 August, 2012

Ukraine adopts controversial language bill

Opponents say the law could upset Ukraine’s fragile linguistic balance and is a cheap ploy by the President to win votes ahead of October’s parliamentary elections.

# language - Sunday 15 July, 2012

Column: I’m not in a “same-sex marriage”. I’m in a marriage.

Small changes in language could make a world of difference at the Constitutional Convention, writes Senator Katherine Zappone – so let’s get it right.

# language - Thursday 5 July, 2012

From The Daily Edge VIDEO: Outtakes of Police Academy human beatbox's Irish trip The Voice This post contains videos

VIDEO: Outtakes of Police Academy human beatbox's Irish trip

Michael Winslow is best-known for his vocal acrobatics on film – this video shows how he does it in the making of an ad for the Vodafone Comedy Festival.

# language - Saturday 23 June, 2012

From The Daily Edge 5 everyday words that are actually a little bit racist Bad Language This post contains images

5 everyday words that are actually a little bit racist

Have you accidentally been using racial slurs? Probably.

# language - Monday 4 June, 2012

From The Daily Edge Say what? 7 common expressions and their origins Idioms This post contains images

Say what? 7 common expressions and their origins

I like the cut of your jib – let’s bury the hatchet.

# language - Thursday 3 May, 2012

Chinese culture and language course for Transition Year students

The course will cover a number of topics such as Chinese food, Chinese music and school life in China, and students can also learn some words and phrases in Mandarin Chinese if they wish.

# language - Sunday 22 April, 2012

From The Daily Edge 13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland... Hiberno-english This post contains images

13 words you'll never hear outside of Ireland...

…unless they are being spoken by an Irish ex-pat, of course.

# language - Saturday 7 April, 2012

Poll: Do you speak Irish on a regular basis? Your Say This post contains a poll

Poll: Do you speak Irish on a regular basis?

Bernard Dunne is leading a nationwide drive getting people to use whatever Irish they still remember. Would you use yours?

# language - Friday 6 April, 2012

Column: Get back on the capall - we should be proud to use the Irish language

The plan is simple: we want to start a revolution and get 100,000 people to use their chuid gaeilge in their daily lives, write Bernard Dunne.

# language - Thursday 29 March, 2012

Census 2011: 1.77m say they are able to speak Irish

In the latest census, people were asked if they were able to speak Irish and, if so, how frequently they did.

# language - Tuesday 14 February, 2012

Babies can understand meaning of words from 6 months - study

New research indicates that infants as young as six months can understand the meaning of full words – twice as early as previously believed.

# language - Saturday 24 December, 2011

From The Daily Edge The words that most annoyed YOU in 2011 AMAZEBALLS

The words that most annoyed YOU in 2011

We asked our readers what words or phrases, like, literally absolutely drove them nuts at the end of the day. They certainly told us.

# language - Sunday 2 October, 2011

From The Daily Edge Stephen Fry's Ros na Rún appearance to air on BBC tonight As Gaeilge This post contains videos

Stephen Fry's Ros na Rún appearance to air on BBC tonight

The actor and writer filmed his cameo as gaeilge last year, as part of a documentary series about world languages.

# language - Tuesday 27 July, 2010

FROM NEXT MONTH we can wave goodbye to “awful swotters” and “jolly japes” – Enid Bltyon’s famous children’s books are getting a linguistic makeover.

The Famous Five are getting a 21st century dialogue update in an attempt to hook the next generation of young readers.

Anne McNeil, publishing director of Hodder Children’s Books, explained the reason behind the decision to The Guardian: “Children who read [the Famous Five books] need to be able to easily understand the characterisations and easily to get into the plots. If the text is revised [they're] more likely to be able to engage with them.”

Although a line has been drawn at entering anything too modern into the storylines (Bltyton-lovers can breathe a sigh of relief that modern slang and mobile phones won’t be making their way between the pages, for example) some are not happy about the changes.

Tony Summerfield, who runs the Enid Blyton Society said: “I am in approval of changing language which has perhaps become offensive or has different meanings, or any racist references,” he said “Certain words such as ‘gay’ or ‘queer’ obviously have different meanings nowadays and it’s fair enough to change them.”

But Summerfield added that he was “thoroughly against unnecessary changes just for the sake of it, from adults who underestimate the intelligence of children.”

While some of the author’s books have already undergone the red pen treatment over racial depictions of characters – The Three Golliwogs were axed in the 1980s, for example – this will be the first time that Blytonisms will get the chop.

Interestingly, Blyton deliberately wrote her dialogue in a colloquial way, so it would sound more realistic to children of the day -  when “golly gosh!” was a perfectly normal expression.

Critics have blasted the move, saying it will cause the spirit of the books to be lost and that it patronises children. If children do have questions about unfamiliar language, they say, it may prompt a discussion that will help the child to understand a different time.

Some changes to Blyton’s language

Mercy me! = Oh no!

Fellow = Old man

It’s all very peculiar = It’s all very strange

Housemistress = Teacher

Awful swotter = Bookworm

School tunic = Uniform

Tinker = Traveller

Dick’s comment that “she must be jolly lonely all by herself” will be turned into “she must get lonely all by herself”. And, weirdly, naming parents “mother and father” has also been deemed to confusing for young people – the publishers are going to opt for “mum and dad” instead.