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Microsoft to create 400 construction jobs with new Dublin data centre

Microsoft is investing just under €100m in an expansion of its data centre in Clondalkin, with 400 construction jobs for 12 months.

Microsoft's premises at Sandyford industrial estate: the software giant is expanding its data centre in Dublin, creating 400 construction jobs.
Microsoft's premises at Sandyford industrial estate: the software giant is expanding its data centre in Dublin, creating 400 construction jobs.
Image: Sasko Lazarov/Photocall Ireland

MICROSOFT HAS ANNOUNCED a major new investment in its data centre at Clondalkin in Dublin, in a move which will create 400 construction jobs.

The expansion – in which Microsoft is investing $130 million (€98 million) – will see a 112,000-square-foot facility built at the Grange Castle business park, where the software giant already has a centre.

When completed, the combined data centres will employ between 50 and 70 people.

Microsoft’s chief financial officer Peter Klein, visiting Dublin to announce the expansion, said Microsoft was “committed to efficiency” and that the data centre would be 50 per cent more efficient than traditional data centres, using renewable wind energy whenever possible.

“This investment shows where we are placing our bets for the future,” Klein said. “As customers embrace Microsoft cloud services such as Office 365, Windows Live, Xbox Live, Bing and the Windows Azure platform, we are investing in regional cloud infrastructure to meet their needs.”

Taoiseach Enda Kenny welcomed the announcement, saying it was a sign that “Ireland continues to regain its international reputation for investment and business”.

“We are delighted that our strategy to become the country of choice for data centres is coming to fruition,” the Taoiseach offered.

We very much recognise the role that cloud computing can play in transforming our public sector as well as being a catalyst for economic growth.

Jobs minister Richard Bruton said the government would build on the growth to make Ireland a world leader in cloud computing.

Microsoft already employs 1,100 people in Ireland between its EMEA Operations Centre, the European Development Centre, the Dublin Data Centre, and its sales and marketing operations.

Microsoft is not the only technology giant to have a data premises in Grange Castle: in September Google announced it would create 200 construction jobs, and 30 full-time positions, in a new data centre in the same business park.

More: PayPal to create 1,000 new jobs in Dundalk

Read: Irish weather brings 230 new jobs with Google data centre

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Gavan Reilly

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