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A temporary, elevated, track in Dublin as visualised by the Copenhagenize Flow people.
A temporary, elevated, track in Dublin as visualised by the Copenhagenize Flow people.

This invention is one reason why we love the Danish

Pop-up cycle lanes.
Dec 26th 2013, 8:00 PM 36,561 36

THE DEARTH OF decent cycle lanes around Ireland is a bugbear. It affects both cyclists (for obvious reasons) and motorists who have to try and create space from nowhere.

All urban planners, then, should turn to Denmark where a company has created a way to allow town designers to test the effectiveness of cycle paths before investing in permanent solitions.

The ‘Copehnhagenize Flow’ system is a series of modular tracks that fit together and create an elevated path above the normal road. This physically separates cyclists from normal traffic and gives the local authority a chance to assess if the track is useful/used in that area.

It takes a day to put in a kilometre of the temporary track – a fraction of the time to build a permanent path. When the test has been complete, the Flow track can be lifted easily and reused.

What do you think? Would you like to see similar tests in Irish cities?

On yer bike: Cycle commuting on the up in Ireland>
Cyclists should face on-the-spot fines for rule-breaking: TD>

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Susan Daly

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