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Comment #2766660 by Corthney O' Connor

Corthney O' Connor Aug 7th 2014, 8:18 AM #

I part- study history in college after taking it on from the leaving cert. I think it’s just one of those subjects that you like or loathe. It’s story telling. It’s not so much intelligence but having being aware what has happened/ continues to happen in the world around you. It shares the exact same similarities as reading the news every morning. I mean why wouldn’t you like to know that?

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Read the article where this comment appeared:

Opinion: What’s the point in learning about history?

Opinion: What’s the point in learning about history?

Every History teacher in the country can attest to hearing the Dreaded Question at least once a year: “What’s the point in learning about this?”

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    Favourite andrew
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    Aug 7th 2014, 9:42 AM

    Agreed.

    And a really simple question: would you go out with a person you knew nothing about?

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    Favourite Kieran Fitzpatrick
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    Aug 7th 2014, 10:10 AM

    How do you justify making a distinction between ‘intelligence’ and ‘an awareness of what has happened/continues to happen in the world’. Isn’t having an awareness of such events just a constituent part of intelligence?

    Also, reading history is definitely not the same as reading the news in the morning, because news media are predominantly descriptive; outside of op eds or Sunday editorials, they tell you the what, when, where rather than the why of a given event and deal with events/issues with the present in mind. They tend not to provide (important) context to the information provided. Well-written history should provide the descriptive as well as the analytical, and construct a meaningful context around whatever the topic is so its audience can come to an informed conclusion.

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    Favourite Dermot Ryan
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    Aug 8th 2014, 2:37 AM

    Kieran – modern media is nearly all opinion subtly interwoven …”sources suggest ” ..i.e. this is what we want you to think ….

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