Advertisement
#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 6°C Monday 6 December 2021

Comment #2136171 by Phyllis Murphy

Phyllis Murphy Feb 18th 2014, 7:56 AM #

My son is dyslexic, he has been taken out of the Irish class because it was too difficult for him yet he is doing quite well in French. Change the way they teach it.

| Share | Report this comment

Read the article where this comment appeared:

Column: I need my daughter to know I didn't sit back and watch our language die

Column: I need my daughter to know I didn't sit back and watch our language die

I took my daughter on her first trip to Dublin on Saturday to participate in the demonstration for Irish language rights. I need her understand her national identity, writes Deirdre Nic Gabhann.

REPLIES

    Favourite The Throwaway
    Hide Comment
    Report as Defamatory
    Report this Comment
    Feb 18th 2014, 12:39 PM

    I had the same problem. But it seems nowadays that ‘Irish culture’ has been defined as been able to speak the language. Even the author says it here I relation to consumerism and the future. It really annoys me that somehow the sum of been Irish has to be that you speak Irish. As if we haven’t accomplished anything else to our name (setting aside the obvious jokes about banking/corruption/etc).

    11
    Favourite Gearóid Oman
    Hide Comment
    Report as Defamatory
    Report this Comment
    Feb 18th 2014, 11:47 PM

    Tá dyslexia agamsa agus mo inion. Tá sí sa Gaelscoil agus níl aon diffriocht idir Gaeilge agus Bearla. It is very badly though. But this does not mean it should not have rights. And that we could not do more to teach it better. It does not have to be at any detriment to teaching English. After all those coming from the Gaelscoil are not of any loss nor do they have lesser jobs nor can they go abroad to work and learn European languages in secondary schools.

    8