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Comment #2244408 by Dennis Collins

Dennis Collins Mar 19th 2014, 2:58 PM #

I reckon you have a much better chance wooing someone on your holidays with a few sentences of Irish and a cheeky Celtic smile, rather than rattling off a Shakespearean sonnet..

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Can you speak Irish? Want to help the world learn?

Can you speak Irish? Want to help the world learn?

Duolingo wants to build an Irish database and you could help.

REPLIES

    Favourite Ross Casey
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:07 PM

    With respect but why? What use is it?

    48
    Favourite Laura Hughes
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:23 PM

    Well Ross, learning different languages can be fun! Some people (like me) enjoy things like this…! And I am very proud of my heritage, culture and history. Part of that is my language, and when I teach my son about Irish history etc, it will be nice, I think, for him to understand the language. To sum up: because its nice and fun. :)

    282
    Favourite Floodzie
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:36 PM

    Ross, I presume after trying to find a monetary value for Irish, you’ll move on to asking why we should learn Shakespeare or Chaucer, the Binomial Theorem or the Euler Method.

    Please don’t vote, we have enough thicks in power as it is.

    168
    Favourite Ross Casey
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:50 PM

    @ Flood – Shakespeare is immensely valuable and beautiful.
    Have you never wooed with a sonnet?

    Irish is valueless.

    25
    Favourite Floodzie
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:56 PM

    You obviously don’t speak Irish. English isn’t the only language with poetry, you know. Try opening a book sometime.

    157
    Favourite Dennis Collins
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:58 PM

    I reckon you have a much better chance wooing someone on your holidays with a few sentences of Irish and a cheeky Celtic smile, rather than rattling off a Shakespearean sonnet..

    142
    Favourite Ross Casey
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    Mar 19th 2014, 2:59 PM

    I am able to speak Irish because I was forced to learn it.

    The last time I had any use of Irish was my leaving cert exam in 1998.
    Never used since. Ridiculous.

    29
    Favourite Floodzie
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    Mar 19th 2014, 3:14 PM

    We could argue all day about the beauty – or otherwise – of the ancient Celtic languages as compared to the guttural, relatively modern Germanic languages (of which English is one), but aesthetics are always subjective.
    Also, I have better things to do than enter into a high-brow discussion with someone who doesn’t know when to capitalise proper nouns.

    72
    Favourite Rugby DadaiO
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    Mar 19th 2014, 3:46 PM

    Irish is a beautiful lyrical language. You might try listening to Lasairfhiona Ni Chonaola. Would love to hear Shakespeare translated into Irish, might make it more palatable.

    58
    Favourite Floodzie
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    Mar 19th 2014, 4:27 PM

    Always loved reading Mairtin O Direain myself. Never made a penny from it, but so happy I studied his poetry.

    Is ce nach cuireann lon faoi mo chum
    Ni cruinnofar a malairt liom…

    Very apt.

    43
    Favourite Tom Gavin
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    Mar 19th 2014, 4:34 PM

    With respect, why are you reading about it if you have no interest in it. Leave it to those who are interested.

    52
    Favourite Ross Casey
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    Mar 19th 2014, 5:10 PM

    @ Flood – it’s so wonderful when people like you who point out spelling and grammar errors make them themselves.
    You obviously don’t think much of the Irish language as you don’t include the fadas on the appropriate vowels.

    5
    Favourite DesBod
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    Mar 19th 2014, 5:12 PM

    Floodzie, you are clearly to immature to engage in proper debate

    5
    Favourite Maggot Nolan
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    Mar 19th 2014, 5:56 PM

    *too

    22
    Favourite Floodzie
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    Mar 19th 2014, 6:41 PM

    Writing on my phone, Ross, no fadas.

    We don’t all have the luxury of sitting at a keyboard in our childhood bedroom while mammy brings us dinner (on a tray – such a BIG boy!), kicking her way through tissues to place it beside the fancy Dell she got you at Christmas. Some of us are at work, you know.

    The Journal is a luxury we indulge in on our break, not a way of life as it obviously is for a trolling keyboard warrior like your good self.

    39
    Favourite Ross Casey
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    Mar 19th 2014, 6:48 PM

    @ Flood – at least you’ve shown what you are.

    Smartphones have a facility for fadas if you’re smart enough to find it.

    As another contributor here said you’ve nothing productive to say so stop embarrassing yourself.

    2
    Favourite Floodzie
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    Mar 19th 2014, 7:08 PM

    Sweet, gentle Ross – what I’ve always loved about your contributions (apart from the imaginative grammar) is how you always shoe-horn your trolling comments into the most tentatively linked thread, and yet become apoplectic when taken to task. As you fume in the fading light before your CRT screen, beneath your Tupac poster (nobody understands you like Tupac), consider pulling the curtains back, standing up, going out and filling your teenage lungs with the good air. Carpe diem Ross, carpe diem.

    25
    Favourite Eric De Red
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    Mar 19th 2014, 7:27 PM

    @Laura

    Judging from your post your son’s mother’s language is English. He shouldn’t have much problem picking it up in Ireland.

    5
    Favourite Laura Hughes
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    Mar 19th 2014, 8:39 PM

    @Eric my son is 2, so he mostly speaks babble at the moment, also the fact that he lives in England, with his parents might make it hard for him to pick up anything in Ireland…?

    If you really want to be a smug pedantic git, go somewhere else to do it. Your comment is utterly pointless.

    32
    Favourite Eric De Red
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    Mar 19th 2014, 9:49 PM

    Laura, your son’s mother’s language is English. Live with it.

    4
    Favourite Declan Byrne
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    Mar 19th 2014, 11:55 PM

    Eric, surely Laura’s son’s mother’s Laura.

    9
    Favourite Mark Coogan
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    Mar 20th 2014, 12:08 AM

    Travel to the west! They would love to hear you talking in Irish!

    7
    Favourite Eric De Red
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    Mar 20th 2014, 5:48 AM

    @Declan. Yes indeed, that is my point.

    1
    Favourite Laura Hughes
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    Mar 20th 2014, 8:30 AM

    @declan – his ‘point’ here is….eh….

    Nope, still have no idea. I very obviously am my sons mother, and very obviously (as you can see by my comments) speak English. Eric is just making random comments that make no sense (theres a surprise) so Ill be ignoring him now!

    4
    Favourite Paula Mc Gavin Dunne
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    Mar 20th 2014, 8:53 AM

    Ross s comment saddened me . These people are out future
    It’s sad enough that we re the only country that does nt use our own language in daily conversation.

    4
    Mute Guapito Donnochito O'Ceallaigh
    Favourite Guapito Donnochito O'Ceallaigh
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    Mar 24th 2014, 1:21 AM

    To refer to a part of culture as valueless says a lot about a person. You devalue it because you are effectively colonized. All knowledge has its use. The language you speak can form the way you think. Learning another language can help you see things very differently as you deconstruct what you have always taken for granted. At a practical level, the more languages you are raised with, the easier it is to master another one.

    5
    Favourite Benjamin Burroughs
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    Mar 25th 2014, 3:19 PM

    Take a small break in Galway or Donegal maybe then to put oil on the rust? :)

    3