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#Read mes

# read-mes - Friday 14 March, 2014

Column: How we lost St Patrick's Day Opinion This post contains a poll

Column: How we lost St Patrick's Day

As I watched the St Patrick’s Day parade march down New York’s Fifth Avenue, the true meaning of our national holiday struck me. And it made me realise many of us fail to understand what March 17 actually represents for our small nation, writes Paul Allen.

# read-mes - Sunday 9 March, 2014

Damien Kiberd: Why are the Irish not more critical of the EU?

And more to the point – are we “f**ked and brainwashed” by the ‘European Project’?

# read-mes - Sunday 2 March, 2014

Damien Kiberd: Government policy on housing is a massive muddle

When the economy collapsed the banks got top priority. Building workers and people who need social housing were far down the pecking order. Now they’re telling us a miracle is on the way…

# read-mes - Tuesday 25 February, 2014

Column: The #GSOC debacle is a war of spin

With a constant flow of leaks, jousting between journalists and politicians, and the resulting war of words spinning out of control, the casualties in the Garda Ombudsman conflict will be high, writes Paul Allen.

# read-mes - Monday 24 February, 2014

# read-mes - Sunday 23 February, 2014

Damien Kiberd: A new property bubble - but not as we know it

A glut of cash buyers, homeowners anchored by negative equity and tracker mortgages – in Dublin, the situation for young people trying to buy is alarming.

# read-mes - Sunday 16 February, 2014

Damien Kiberd: Why neither Ireland nor USA wants to question tax haven

Official Ireland does not like inconvenient truths – which is why Trinity professor Jim Stewart’s spot-on research makes it defensive.

# read-mes - Sunday 9 February, 2014

Damien Kiberd: RTÉ thinks it played safe on Pantigate - I beg to differ

RTÉ would do well to remember the story of Jurgen Klinsmann’s dive in the 1990 World Cup and the effect that had on schoolboy footballers for years to come.

# read-mes - Thursday 6 February, 2014

Column: Why are we still dying to party?

The Stardust fire happened 33 years ago, but we still have not learned the lessons of that horrific night, writes Paul Allen.

# read-mes - Sunday 26 January, 2014

Damien Kiberd: Why was Ariel Sharon's funeral such a lonely affair?

Psychopath or a good soldier? The ‘no show’ of global leaders at his final goodbye nods to a life of contradictions.

# read-mes - Sunday 12 January, 2014

Damien Kiberd: So what if Kenny and Bruton didn't lecture Middle East on human rights?

Were they not correct to put the business interests of Ireland first? And what about those other human rights abusers Ireland conveniently chooses to ignore?

# read-mes - Thursday 9 January, 2014

Phil Prendergast: 8 reasons why pylons should not go ahead

MEP outlines her arguments for opposing Eirgrid’s Gridlink infrastructure plan, which would see giant pylons across rural areas.

# read-mes - Sunday 5 January, 2014

Damien Kiberd: Why middle-aged men with money invest in Netflix...

…And why their tech confusion means there is no logic in how they price its shares.

# read-mes - Sunday 22 December, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Drop the goody-two-shoes approach to economic policy

Job figure increases are welcome – but Government needs to be bolshy to grab the three things it needs for proper growth.

# read-mes - Sunday 15 December, 2013

Damien Kiberd: We recover part of our sovereignty - but banks still losing their senses

The target borrower for banks is often a high net worth individual living overseas: ordinary owner-occupiers can go and whistle.

# read-mes - Thursday 12 December, 2013

Column: Michael O'Leary turned Santa because he had to

Ryanair customers feeling the love – because social media has the power to make or break the business.

# read-mes - Tuesday 10 December, 2013

Column: The equality struggle didn’t end with Mandela’s prison release, it must continue

Mandela did not topple white rule single-handedly – nor did he ever claim to, writes David Cronin, who says that while he retains a deep admiration for Mandela, he did turn his back on some of his beliefs.

# read-mes - Sunday 8 December, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Forbes has Ireland all wrong

Ireland Inc. got the thumbs-up as the best place to do business. The glossy magazine headline hides a less attractive truth about tax, unemployment and Stalinist powers.

# read-mes - Sunday 1 December, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Reasons to be cheerful? Maybe - but cautious too

Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Doing the hokey cokey or pleading poverty at the back door of the Bundesbank?

# read-mes - Thursday 28 November, 2013

Column: Calling time on multinational imperialism

With employment figures finally on the up and job announcements by the likes of Microsoft making the headlines, it is time to start cheerleading our thriving start-up sector, writes Paul Allen.

# read-mes - Sunday 24 November, 2013

Damien Kiberd: 'Top-up' payments part of a game whose rules need to change

“The model of social partnership promoted since 1987 relies for its internal cohesion on permitting people at various levels within the system to milk that system for their own benefit.”

# read-mes - Friday 22 November, 2013

Nick Leeson: Positive talk sounds hollow in the corridors of power

Talking up the state of the economy got us into this mess in the first place – but things are not looking up for the average man and woman.

# read-mes - Sunday 17 November, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Why we need to deliver an Irish version of the NHS

Two million Irish people pay for private health cover out of fear of our public system – but both are broken. Here’s what we COULD do…

# read-mes - Thursday 7 November, 2013

Column: 'Facts invalidate Emer Costello's anecdotes about Gaza'

Israeli ambassador to Ireland responds to Irish MEP’s statements about Israeli policy.

# read-mes - Sunday 3 November, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Jihad against Junior Cert is bizarre

Rather than tackle these rather basic issues of numeracy and literacy, we are meddling with exam systems which may not be a problem at all.

# read-mes - Sunday 27 October, 2013

Damien Kiberd: If Enda wants cash from his EU mates, he needs to stop ticking the boxes

Taoiseach Kenny wrote a letter to 26 EU heads about their 2012 “commitment” to give Ireland special treatment – but they don’t care for wimpish reminders.

# read-mes - Saturday 26 October, 2013

Phil Prendergast: As a mother, I felt physically sick over Roma children mistakes

“Of course this is unlikely to happen to an Irish family – we are not subjected to the odious stereotypes that the Roma community are forced to endure,” writes the MEP for Ireland South.

# read-mes - Sunday 20 October, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Health is not just Angola, it’s the original Heart of Darkness

What’s to become of the very sick who can’t afford insurance cover and who don’t qualify for medical cards? Does anyone – including Reilly – know?

# read-mes - Wednesday 16 October, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Budget 2014 arithmetic not just iffy - it's scary

The figures are extraordinarily precise, writes TheJournal.ie columnist Damien Kiberd – as imaginary numbers often neatly are.

# read-mes - Tuesday 8 October, 2013

Damien Kiberd: Austerity economics have us locked in Permaslump

“Families want to exit their own micro-bailouts too,” writes new TheJournal.ie columnist Damien Kiberd.

# read-mes - Sunday 29 September, 2013

Column: RTÉ's future plans are missing one vital ingredient: you.

The public service broadcaster’s just-published five-year strategy is not short on ambition, but it may point towards an organisation more ready to forge commercial partnerships than embrace its public, writes Mark Cullinane.

# read-mes - Saturday 28 September, 2013

Declan Ganley: "Fewer politicians" is not an argument for getting rid of Seanad

“The constitution did not make it a retirement home for failed politicians and a creche for aspiring ones – the political class did.”

Richard Bruton: Scrap the political creche and convalescent home that is the Seanad

Fine Gael’s Director of Elections for the Seanad Referendum on why he believes “undemocratic institution” has no place in modern Ireland.

Aaron McKenna: The 9% VAT rate proves it - lowering taxes creates jobs

“It is disingenuous of government to claim that it was a temporary measure… and getting rid of it is a kick in the head to anyone who has invested in the hospitality industry.”

# read-mes - Friday 27 September, 2013

Column: What exactly does a senator do in a day?

Professor John Crown, independent senator, answers the question with a timeline of a typical day in the life for him.

Column: What does the climate change report mean for Ireland?

The nation may face major economic and demographic upheaval unless steps are taken now on climate change, writes Professor John Sweeney.

# read-mes - Friday 20 September, 2013

Nick Leeson: In debt? Don't panic.

The former trader’s new book tries to help people tackles debt and find a path through the stress and complexities of dealing with financial institutions.

# read-mes - Monday 26 August, 2013

Column: Is it time to stop bashing Bertie?

Serious question, writes Paul Allen. If we do not learn from our mistakes and more readily embrace the knowledge of those that have made them, we will always be prone to repeating the errors of the past.

# read-mes - Sunday 18 August, 2013

Column: Why are we making citizenship difficult for those who are entitled to it?

If someone is willing to contribute to Irish society why do we put barriers in their way? asks Dr Matt Cannon.

# read-mes - Friday 16 August, 2013

Column: Why is Guantanamo Bay still open?

Detainees eligible for release from Guantanamo Bay are caught in limbo: the US won’t accept them and foreign countries are reluctant to take in refugees who have been incarcerated with terrorists, writes Scott Fitzsimmons.