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Urban Outfitters criticised over 'drunk Irish' themed clothing

A Fine Gael councillor has called on the fashion retailer to withdraw items with the “damaging” stereotype.

Image: urbanoutfitters.com

FASHION RETAILER URBAN Outfitters has been criticised for selling items which present a “clichéd” depiction of Irish people as drunk.

Dublin city councillor Naoise Ó Muirí has said the image of Irishness portrayed on the clothing line could be “very damaging” to Ireland as it seeks to rebuilt its image as a place to do business. He called on the retailer to withdraw the items.

He was speaking after it emerged Urban Outfitters was selling t-shirts and hats featuring “Irish yoga” – an image of a person on their hands and knees being sick – and women’s tops reading “Kiss me. I’m drunk or Irish, or whatever.”

The items are available on the retailer’s online store in the US. Cllr Ó Muirí said:

While we as a society have to acknowledge that we have our demons to confront regarding our relationship with alcohol, this clichéd depiction of the Irish on an international stage is very damaging to us.

He added that this was especially important in the run-up to St Patrick’s Day when “all eyes will be on Ireland”, and said Irish people should be aiming to move on from the “drunken Paddy” stereotype.

Several Irish-American members of Congress have also called on Urban Outfitters to stop selling the Irish-themed apparel, which they said represented “stereotyping and denigration”, Politicker reports.

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A spokesperson for Urban Outfitters told TheJournal.ie they had no comment at this time.

More: Urban Outfitters still selling ‘Navajo’ clothing despite criticism>

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Michael Freeman

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