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#Victimisation

# victimisation - Friday 5 January, 2018

Shop which told pregnant employee to 'look better and appear happy' ordered to pay her €18,000

The Labour Court ruled that Karolina Poslajko had been discriminated against by her former employer, Kildare town-based Clelands Supermarkets Ltd.

# victimisation - Friday 17 July, 2015

Minimum-wage employee who was working 70 hour weeks while heavily pregnant receives €55,000 in compensation

Polish national Ewelina Gacek has won her case against €uro 50 store at the Equality Tribunal.

# victimisation - Monday 15 September, 2014

Receptionist wins €63k for victimisation and reduced hours after maternity leave

In a separate case, the HSE was found not to have discriminated against a young man with a number of health issues.

# victimisation - Tuesday 11 January, 2011

Former BBC presenter wins age discrimination case

Ex-Countryfile presenter Miriam O’Reilly has won an employment tribunal against the BBC on the grounds of ageism, following her dismissal when the programme was moved to a primetime slot.

# victimisation - Tuesday 17 August, 2010

A FORMER Dublin hotel manager has been awarded €100,000 in compensation for victimisation and gender discrimination at the Equality Tribunal.

The tribunal found that Denise Bratt, who worked at the Comfort Inn on Parnell Square in Dublin, between 2003 and 2007 was denied access to promotion, forced to take redundancy and was also under pressure to waive her right to take legal action.

Her employer had planned to open a new hotel nearby and Batt had been told she was a preferred candidate to run the hotel. However, when she returned from maternity leave her employer gave her a lesser role telling her she should “be relieved” as there would not be as much pressure on her. A colleague had been appointed as manager of the new  hotel, a job that Batt has not have the opportunity to interview for.

In July 2007, Batt told her employer she was pregnant. When the hotel changed owners in August, her new employers told her they would make her redundant. Batt was later hospitalised following the meeting due to blood pressure, her doctors also feared at the time that Batt may miscarry.

Two days later, Batt was released and allowed home, a supervisor called to her door and asked her to sign a legal waiver in exchange for redundancy. Batt refused and was sent redundancy papers the following day.

The tribunal found against Batt’s employers citing victimisation and gender discrimination.