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Dublin: 8 °C Thursday 28 May, 2020
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Nationwide hosepipe ban to kick in from Friday

There has been little or no rain over the last 30 days.

Image: Shutterstock/Tedgun

A NATIONWIDE HOSEPIPE ban will come into effect from 8am on Friday until midnight on Tuesday 31 July, Irish Water has confirmed.

It comes as a hosepipe ban was implemented in the Greater Dublin Area on Monday – that’s now been extended to the entire country.

Met Éireann said that there has been little or no rain over the last 30 days, and even if it did rain, no water would reach water sources for at least a week as it will be absorbed by the ground.

Those who break the ban could face a fine of €125.

Irish Water explained why the ban was necessary:

The National Water Conservation Order (or hosepipe ban) has the potential to suppress any non-essential increases in demand during this period, and prevent increased abstraction at a time when the raw water sources are least able to support these volumes.

The ban prohibits the use of water for:

  • Gardening
  • Cleaning your car or private leisure boat
  • Filling or maintaining a domestic swimming or paddling pool
  • Filling ponds (this doesn’t include fish ponds)
  • Filling an ornamental fountain.

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Since the weather temperature increase, the demand for water has increased by 15%, according to the water utility.

“We are really grateful for the measures that people have taken to conserve water so far,” Iris Water spokesperson Kate Gannon said.

“We hope that placing a Water Conservation Order (hosepipe ban) will make people more mindful of their responsibilities and the impact their water usage is having on their neighbours and communities.”

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