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Diageo to apply for makeover of Guinness brewery

Dublin Chamber of Commerce has welcomed the plans which are being submitted to Dublin City Council for consideration this week.

Image: Mark Stedman/Photocall Ireland

GUINNESS MANUFACTURER DIAGEO is to apply for planning permission for a €100 million overhaul of its iconic St James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin.

The plans will be submitted to Dublin City Council tomorrow for the redevelopment of large sections of the St James’s Gate site on the southside of the city – the home to the world famous brew since it was leased by Arthur Guinness for 9,000 years in 1759.

The plans will see the north side of the site between James’s Street and Victoria Quay redeveloped.

If and when plans are approved Diageo will decide if it is to go ahead with the work early next year, according to the Irish Independent which reports the story this morning.

The news has been welcomed by the Dublin Chamber of Commerce which said it was welcome boost for the capital and proof that it remains a competitive location for manufacturing.

“Despite the rise in the services sector a strong manufacturing sector remains crucial for the Irish economy,” the Chamber’s chief executive Gina Quin said in a statement.

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“Diageo’s proposal to expand brewing facilities is good news for Dublin and demonstrates that ‘urban manufacturing’ is not an oxymoron.”

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Hugh O'Connell

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