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Good news: Dublin Bus fleet now 100 per cent accessible

The company said 2013 is a “momentous year” for Dublin bus, with all of its fleet now fully wheelchair accessible.

Dolores Henchin, Dublin Bus Accessibility Officer, Andy Corrigan, Driver, Roger Flood, Travel Assitant, Dublin Bus, Frank Daly, Service User, Edward Crean, Policy Advisor, National Disability Authority.
Dolores Henchin, Dublin Bus Accessibility Officer, Andy Corrigan, Driver, Roger Flood, Travel Assitant, Dublin Bus, Frank Daly, Service User, Edward Crean, Policy Advisor, National Disability Authority.
Image: Shane O'Neill / Fennells.

WHETHER YOU ARE a regular user of Dublin Bus, or planning to use it at some point in the future, we have good news for you: the fleet is now accessible to all.

The company described 2013 as “a momentous year for Dublin Bus” and has delivered on its commitment to having a fully low-floor wheelchair accessible fleet by the close of 2012.

This is good news not only for wheelchair users but for customers with mobility impairments, older customers and customers with buggies.

All buses are now equipped with low floor chassis, kneeling suspension to further reduce entry step height, retractable ramp at entrance and a priority space for wheelchair users as standard.

The new buses have been deployed across the Dublin Bus network and operate on Routes 1, 4, 7, 29a, 33, 102, 104 and 151.

This achievement was made possible by the recent acquisition of 80 new highly advanced double decker buses as part of Dublin Bus’ fleet replacement programme and funded by the National Transport Authority.

The 80 new buses have a range of improved accessibility features, including:

  • Bilingual passenger information signs in the upper and lower saloons announcing the next bus stop (the company is also piloting audio next stop announcements on Route 7)
  • Clearer signage to identify the priority space for wheelchair users
  • Improved signage at the front seating area for priority seats.

Accessibility group

These developments are in part a result of Dublin Bus’ accessibility working group. The National Disability Authority’s Director, Siobhán Barron, said they welcome the achievement, seeing it as “a significant step in supporting people with disabilities as active citizens in the community’’.

Since 2007, Dublin Bus has also provided a Travel Assistance Scheme, where a Dublin Bus Travel Assistant accompanies the service user the first few times they travel and also provides advice on planning a journey using Dublin Bus, the DART or the Luas.

Bus user Frank Daly said of the scheme, which runs from 8am to 6pm, Monday to Friday, is free of charge and available to people aged 18 or over:

It has given me greater independence and has been a very positive experience for me.

Dublin Bus’ Accessibility Officer, Dolores Henchin said of today’s news:

Reaching this target ensures that anyone across the Greater Dublin Area can travel on our services as far as Newcastle in County Wicklow, Balbriggan in North County Dublin and Maynooth in County Kildare.

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