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Dublin: 13 °C Saturday 23 February, 2019
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From 'bullet books' to Seán O’Casey watercolours: A different look at the Easter Rising

A new exhibition looks at how minority communities in Dublin responded to 1916.

A NEW EXHIBITION documents how minority communities in Dublin responded to the Easter Rising.

1916: Tales from the Other Side includes an archive of books, manuscripts and artefacts, focusing on stories from the Irish Protestant and Jewish communities.

The exhibition, which is taking place in Dublin’s Marsh’s Library, introduces artists, cleaners and former revolutionaries who witnessed the historic events.

It also follows a student librarian, Richard FitzPatrick, as he joins the British Army to fight in the First World War in the aftermath of the Rising.

From 'bullet books' to Seán O’Casey watercolours: A different look at the Easter Rising
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  • Bullet Book

    Source: Picasa
  • Postcard

    Source: Picasa
  • Bullet Book

    Source: Picasa
  • Roger Casement letter

    A letter written to his friend Richard (Dick) Morten in May 1914.
  • Jessica Taylor, a teenager who travelled to Dublin in 1916

    The teenager in her volunteer nurse uniform. Source: Picasa
  • British soldier

    A keepsake given to Jessica Taylor. Source: Picasa
  • Seán O'Casey drawing

    Source: Picasa
  • Seán O'Casey drawing

    Source: Picasa

All images c/o Marsh’s Library

‘Bullet books’ – ancient texts which were shot during Easter Week and have deliberately never been repaired – will be on display, as will letters from Roger Casement and rare watercolours by Seán O’Casey.

Sue Hemmens, the library’s deputy keeper, said the exhibition’s contents are “drawn from a small but significant archive”.

“They contribute a more nuanced view of the complex political and cultural identities of the Irish revolutionary period,” she added.

More information on the exhibition can be read here.

Read: You can step into the Dublin of 1916 thanks to this new website

Read: ‘Rumours of mischief brewing’: Fascinating documents give insight into British response to Rising

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About the author:

Órla Ryan

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