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Australia defends decision to leave asylum-seekers' bodies in Indian Ocean

Up to 13 bodies were spotted in the water but were not recovered while the hunt for survivors was on and now customs off say they were now too busy rescuing other boats.

Photo taken on 14 April, shows a fishing boat carrying Vietnamese asylum seekers near the shore of Australia's Christmas Island.
Photo taken on 14 April, shows a fishing boat carrying Vietnamese asylum seekers near the shore of Australia's Christmas Island.
Image: AP/Press Association Images

PRIME MINISTER JULIA Gillard has defended the Australian government’s decision to leave the bodies of drowned asylum-seekers in the ocean, as a search began for yet another vessel in the Indian Ocean.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority said two aircraft had been dispatched to look for a boat north of the Cocos Island.

“The search area is approximately 260 nautical miles north of the Cocos Islands. We do not have any information about the number of people on board,” AMSA said in a statement, without providing further details.

It comes after an extensive three-day air and sea search for an asylum-seeker boat which is presumed to have capsized near the Indian Ocean territory of Christmas Island with at least 55 people on board last week. No survivors were found.

Up to 13 bodies were spotted in the water, along with debris and life-jackets, but they were not recovered while the hunt for survivors was on and customs officials said Monday they were now too busy rescuing other boats.

A marks the spot where it is believed the boat has sank. (Google Maps)

“That is a very tough decision but it is an operational decision,” Gillard told reporters.

“As border command has made clear, they always put the highest priority on saving lives and I think we would all understand why that’s got to come first in any tasking or any work that border command does.”

Australia’s Tamil community criticised the move, saying there would be anger if the bodies of Australian victims were left in the remote waters off the Indian Ocean territory of Christmas Island.

“If they were Australians I am sure that I would be angry,” Bala Vigneswaran, executive officer of the Australian Tamil Congress, told the ABC.

“I’m sure that everybody here in Australia would be very disappointed and I don’t think we would have treated Australians like this.”

Asked about this criticism, Gillard said Australia would “always put the highest priority on saving lives”.

The doomed vessel was one of several arriving over the past week, with seven boats carrying a total of about 500 people intercepted since Wednesday, including one carrying more than 90 people which sought assistance near Christmas Island.

“We have seen yet another dreadful tragedy, considerable loss of life,” Gillard said of the latest sinking.

“I think it breaks everybody’s heart to see that loss of life, which is why we send the message very clearly; do not risk your life, do not risk your children’s lives, do not get on a boat.”

Hundreds of asylum-seekers, many fleeing Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and Sri Lanka, have drowned en route to Australia in recent years. The boats they take from transit hubs in places such as Indonesia are often overcrowded and unseaworthy.

A record influx of asylum-seekers arriving by boat in Australia is expected to see numbers top 25,000 in the 12 months to June 30, despite punitive “no advantage” policies banishing refugees to remote Pacific detention camps.

Boats have arrived regularly at Christmas Island in recent weeks, despite the perils of the journey which have seen hundreds drown. Last month 28 life jackets washed up on the Cocos Islands, sparking fears of another mass drowning.

- © AFP, 2013

Related: Hundreds of Vietnamese men, women and children flee to Australian shores>

More: Search for sinking asylum seeker boat called off>

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