This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 2 °C Wednesday 11 December, 2019
Advertisement

Bolivia bans cars for a day to help reduce pollution

Bolivia’s President even left the car behind and jogged to work yesterday.

Bolivia's President Evo Morales (second left) even jogged to work yesterday.
Bolivia's President Evo Morales (second left) even jogged to work yesterday.

BOLIVIA’S PRESIDENT EVO Morales showed his support for the country’s inaugural National Day of the Pedestrian on Sunday by jogging to work.

The South American country banned all motorised vehicles, including public transport, from cities yesterday, reports the BBC.

The initiative was taken to raise awareness about the environment, the Bolivian government said.

Morales was pictured jogging in La Paz surrounded by bodyguards who were also decked out in their running gear. He ran the full 6km from the official presidential residence to government headquarters.

His government has come in for criticism lately as it plans to build a highway through the Amazon rainforest. Officials hope that yesterday’s efforts will remind people that Morales is known to be an advocate of environmental issued.

According to authorities, two millon cars were taken off the streets yesterday, highlighting Bolivia’s commitment to “Mother Nature”.

Latin American news channel NTN24 reported that the streets were turned into playgrounds for pedestrians who reclaimed the streets.

Artists, street performers and exercise instructors set up stalls on Sunday, while in La Paz, some pedestrians dressed up as zebras and played hopscotch.

Bolivia’s National Day of the Pedestrian has been made an annual event and will occure on the first Sunday of September each year.

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

Read next:

COMMENTS (6)