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Dublin: 7 °C Tuesday 12 November, 2019
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British businesses warned against weaseling out of refunding Irish customers

The UK is still subject to European consumer law.

Image: Shutterstock/luminaimages

EUROPE HAS WARNED businesses in the UK against trying to dodge giving refunds to EU customers.

The issue was brought to the attention of the European Consumer Centre (ECC) after one UK-based trader refused to refund an Irish consumer who had bought goods online – citing the result of the Brexit referendum as the reason.

The item in question was a dress which the buyer said didn’t fit correctly.

Under EU law a 14-day ‘cooling-off’ period exists, when the person doesn’t have to give a reason to receive a full refund.

However, when this person went to get their money back the company told them that EU consumer law no longer applied in the UK.

Not happy 

The ECC are pretty clear on this: EU consumer law for Britain is going nowhere just yet.

“A trader using Brexit to refuse the consumer’s right to cancel a distance contract is disregarding the legislation currently in force in the UK to protect consumers,” it said in a statement.

The consumer body states that these rules are “unlikely to change in the near future” and that “negotiations in relation to trade and other issues that may impact our future relationship are expected to take quite some time”.

Do not let Brexit be used as an attempt to deter you from availing of your consumer rights. It’s business as usual until further notice.

The part of EU law that makes sure consumers can change their mind when buying something off the the internet is the EU Consumer Rights Directive, which is transposed into the UK law.

Beyond the initial fortnight laid down, it is possible that this period can be extended should there be a “breach of information” from the trader.

Read: Vincent Browne: The EU, its elites and its hyper fans had this coming

Also: Thousands of Britons have pledged to combat racism by wearing a safety pin

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