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Treats at the tills: Supermarkets asked to ban sweets from the checkouts

It could be an end to seeing sweets and chocolate at the tills as Safefood wants an end to unhealthy treats at queuing areas.

UNHEALTHY TREATS AT supermarket checkouts and queuing areas is contributing to childhood obesity, according to Safefood.

The promoters of food safety and nutrition issues in Ireland say they have asked the major Irish supermarkets to consider removing unhealthy snacks from checkouts areas, with Senator Feargal Quinn, formerly of SuperQuinn, lending his support to the campaign.

Supermarkets

Martin Higgins, Chief Executive, Safefood said they have approached CEOs of Aldi Ireland, Dunnes Stores, Lidl Ireland, Musgraves Group and Tesco Ireland to ask them to support the campaign.

If they major chains agree, then it could mean the end to sweets in easy grabbing reach of children.

Safefood said that there most recent survey shows that 47 per cent of shoppers find junk food like sweets, chocolate and crisps hard to resist at checkouts, while 32 per cent shoppers say they regularly buy junk food on an impulse while waiting in the checkout queue.

The survey also found that 73 per cent of shoppers believed that having the junk food there is contributing to obesity with 29 per cent stating they would be more likely to shop in supermarkets that had a sweet-free zone at the checkouts.

Just say no

In their latest TV campaign on healthy eating, Safefood stresses the value of saying ‘no’ to children when they ask for goodies at the supermarket. The said the message is simple – saying no once while doing the shopping is easier than saying no repeatedly at home.

Higgins said the childhood obesity campaign is focused on providing parents with advice on practical changes they can make with their families, like saying no to treats in the supermarket.

“Facing an array of foods high in fat and sugar at checkouts makes it much more difficult for all consumers, especially those shopping with children, to make healthier choices,” he said.

“We hope that supermarkets will support this initiative by introducing sweet-free checkouts.”

Poll: Should supermarkets stop selling sweets at the checkout?>

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