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Dublin: 22 °C Tuesday 23 July, 2019
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Never mind the cordon: Christ Church reverses decision to close on Easter Sunday

The cathedral said it plans to remember those who died in the 1916 Rising during its Easter Sunday morning service.

Image: Shutterstock/Pom Pom

CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL IN Dublin says it has reversed its decision to close on Easter Sunday following consultation with government officials and gardaí.

The city centre church initially cancelled its 27 March service due to safety cordons and traffic restrictions for the centenary celebrations of the 1916 Rising.

The church said last month that gardaí had requested that the front gates of the cathedral remain locked for the day and that clergy had been told there would be no access to the property in the morning.

However, in a statement last night, Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin Dr Michael Jackson said Christ Church would open as normal for 10am service on Easter Day.

Jackson said clergy, staff and congregation will be allowed through the outer security cordon to park in a designated city centre area, from where they will brought to the cathedral by shuttle bus.

During the morning service, as the parade is passing the cathedral, the congregation will pray for the country and remember those who died during the Rising, he said.

The cathedral will then close for a short period before re-opening its doors when the parade finishes to allow visitors to enter.

However, other city centre churches – including St Ann’s, St Stephen’s, St George’s and St Audoen’s – will remain closed on Easter Sunday.

Read: The GPO’s flashy new 1916 exhibit is a cross between Rebellion and Call of Duty

Read: Fascinating statistics compare modern-day Ireland to the country in 1916

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Catherine Healy

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