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Dublin: 3 °C Wednesday 13 November, 2019
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Cockroach infestations are at their highest for a decade

Dublin is the most cockroach-infested county in Ireland.

Image: Shutterstock/chaipanya

2016 SAW A 69% increase in the number of cockroach infestation callouts for pest control company Rentokil.

The company says that the infestations are caused by a number of factors, including the growing popularity of imported foods combined with an increase in foreign travel, and overall warmer weather conditions. Whilst the impact of this increase has been felt nationwide, Dublin is the most cockroach-infested county in Ireland, with two thirds of all infestations reported in Ireland being located in the capital.

According to Rentokil, many restaurant staff do not recognise when incoming stock contains a cockroach infestation, so customers should be vigilant against the pest when dining. The insects come with a number of health risks, carrying salmonella, typhoid and gastroenteritis, while their droppings can cause both asthma and eczema. Cockroaches also cause a terrible odour.

Dr Colm Moore, Area Technical Manager at Rentokil UK, Ireland and the Baltics, said callouts are rising every year.

We have seen continued increase in the number of cockroach-related call outs and enquiries in commercial and residential premises. 2016 was the twelfth consecutive year that we have seen the number of callouts and enquiries grow, so it is vital that those working in the hospitality sector look out for the signs of the public health pests.

“Cockroaches pose a clear risk to human health and we all have a responsibility to be vigilant to signs of an infestation.”

Cockroaches are among the toughest insects, with some species capable of remaining active for a month without food. They are found in kitchens, bathrooms, basements and drains and will happily eat soap residue, toilet paper and tissues – even shed skin cells and hair.

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