#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 11°C Wednesday 18 May 2022
Advertisement

Richmond’s Confederate monuments to be given to city’s Black history museum

The monuments, which have been taken down in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement, include a massive statue of General Robert E. Lee.

Image: PA Images

VIRGINIA AND RICHMOND officials today announced a tentative agreement to transfer ownership of the city’s now mostly removed Confederate monuments to the Black History Museum and Cultural Centre of Virginia.

Included in the transfer would be an enormous statue of General Robert E Lee that was removed earlier this year, as well as the 40-foot-tall pedestal that held it. Pedestal removal work at the site is still underway.

Under the plan announced by governor, Ralph Northam, and Richmond mayor, Levar Stoney, the Black History Museum would work with the Valentine museum of Richmond and the local community to determine the memorials’ fates.

The deal requires the City Council’s approval, which Stoney said he would seek next month. The arrangement would enable the community to take a deliberate approach in its reckoning with such divisive symbols, Stoney said in a statement.

“Entrusting the future of these monuments and pedestals to two of our most respected institutions is the right thing to do,” Stoney said.

Stoney directed the removal of the city’s Confederate monuments last summer amid the protest movement that erupted after the police killing of George Floyd.

#Open journalism No news is bad news Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

The statues have been in storage since then, at least part of that time at the city’s wastewater plant. Not all of the pedestals have been removed.

Around the same time that the city’s statues were removed, Northam announced plans to remove the Lee statue, which was located on state property. But litigation tied up his plans until earlier this year.

The statue was removed in September, and work to take down the enormous pedestal began earlier this month.

About the author:

Press Association

Read next:

COMMENTS (10)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel