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Coronavirus: Six deaths and 612 new cases confirmed in Ireland

Dr Ronan Glynn said that “since the first case of Covid-19 was confirmed in Ireland last February, our lives have changed in ways we never thought possible”.

Image: Sam Boal/RollingNews.ie

Updated Feb 28th 2021, 5:27 PM

PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICIALS have confirmed a further 612 cases of Covid-19 in Ireland, including 289 cases in Dublin.

The National Public Health Emergency Team (NPHET) has reported that six more people have died with Covid-19, bringing the death toll to 4,319.

The total number of confirmed cases in Ireland now stands at 219,592.

Of the cases notified today:

  • 300 are men and 311 are women
  • 72% are under 45 years of age
  • The median age is 32 years old
  • 289 in Dublin, 45 in Limerick, 34 in Longford, 33 in Galway, 26 in Kildare and the remaining 185 cases are spread across 19 other counties.

The ages of those who died ranged between 41 and 86, with a median of 63. All of the deaths occurred in February.

At 8am today, 554 Covid-19 patients were hospitalised, of which 133 were in ICU. 19 more people with Covid-19 have been admitted to hospital in the last 24 hours.

The national 14-day incidence rate is 212.2 cases per 100,000 people today.

By county, it is highest in Offaly, Longford, and Dublin, and lowest in Kerry, Cork and Kilkenny.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Dr Ronan Glynn said that “since the first case of Covid-19 was confirmed in Ireland last February, our lives have changed in ways we never thought possible”.

“More than 6,300 people on our island have lost their lives with Covid-19. We remember them, and their families and friends, as well as the many people who remain seriously ill or who are dealing with long-term health issues because of this disease,” Dr Glynn said.

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“The response of colleagues across all parts of our health system has been remarkable. We should be extraordinarily proud, and take great heart, from the dedication and resilience which has been – and continues to be – shown by everyone involved in this response,” he said.

Dr Glynn said that there are “more concrete reasons for hope and optimism now than at any time over the last 12 months”, citing weekly reductions in case numbers and hospital patients, the rollout of the vaccine, and the commitment of health workers.

“We have an educated and informed public and most people continue to do most of the right things most of the time – overcoming disinformation and playing their part in solidarity with one another,” he said.

“We still have a way to go. Our case numbers are still far too high and we must continue to do all we can to suppress this disease over the coming weeks. But if we can do this successfully through March, our focus will begin to turn to what we can do, rather than what we cannot.

“Yes, we need to be cautious and yes, there will be challenges over the coming months. But together, through science and solidarity, we will get through this and this pandemic will end.”

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