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Dublin: 12 °C Saturday 17 November, 2018
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If you're driving around Dublin today, watch out for cyclists - thousands of cyclists

They’re cycling a long way.

Image: RollingNews.ie

THOUSANDS OF CYCLISTS have set off from Dublin’s Smithfield for the inaugural Great Dublin Bike Ride.

The event is expected to host 3,000 cyclists from 28 nations.

The Great Dublin Bike Ride is based on the successful sportif model used internationally, promoting cycling and mass participation.

Two scenic routes of 60km and 100km have been designed for the event with both routes starting and finishing in the heart of Dublin’s Smithfield.

The first participants are due back in Smithfield after 11am.

The cycle meant early closures to much of Dublin’s north quays, but have since reopened and traffic is moving well.

PastedImage-96801 Source: Garda Mapping Unit

While other roads will not be closed, those driving along the route are warned that delays are to be expected.

The 60km route takes riders out of town through Clontarf, Malahide, Swords, Dublin Airport, Blanchardstown, Navan Road and back into Smithfield.

The longer route goes through north Dublin, Naul, Bellewstown, Garristown, Ashbourne, Ratoath, before joining up with the shorter route at Blanchardstown.

PastedImage-59097 Source: Garda Mapping Unit

Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport, Paschal Donohoe said:

“I want to wish all the participants and organisers the very best of luck with the Great Dublin Bike Ride.

“The Bike Ride provides a tremendous opportunity for cyclists to participate in a unique event based on physical activity and community engagement. I encourage everyone to come to Smithfield and cheer on our participants. It is wonderful to see the growing participation numbers in cycling both for leisure and active transport.”

Read: Power meters for bikes – why they’re all the rage

Read: Should all cyclists and pedestrians have to wear hi-vis vests?

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