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Digicel to cut workforce by 25% as part of 'global transformation'

It’s part of its 2030 strategy, the company said today.

Denis O'Brien.
Denis O'Brien.
Image: RollingNews.ie

DIGICEL, THE TELECOMS group chaired by businessman Denis O’Brien, is to cut 25% of its global workforce over the next 18 months.

In a statement on its website, Digicel announced its 2030 global transformation programme, which it says promises customers “a completely new communications and entertainment experience made possible by a more agile, customer-centric application of resources and investment”.

It also announced that it has signed a global partnership agreement with telecommunications provider ZTE.

Under its Digicel 2030 transformation, the company will undertake a complete re-design of its organisation structure, which will result in an approximate 25% reduction of its global workforce over the next year and a half.

This will begin with the offer of an enhanced voluntary separation programme, opening on 1 March 2017.

The company said it has invested over $1.65 billion in upgrading its networks and platforms and rolling out broadband fibre over the last three years. Its total of 120,000 customers is “well ahead” of its business plan, it said.

It has operations in 31 markets in the Caribbean, Central America and South Pacific.

Digicel Group CEO, Colm Delves, said:

“We are building Digicel for 2030 and beyond. Our transformation programme sees us taking the bull by the horns and daring to be different by challenging the status quo and by innovation-led growth. That’s what we are known for and that’s what we will continue to be known for into the future.”

Digicel was founded by O’Brien in 2000.

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