This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 12 °C Thursday 17 October, 2019
Advertisement

Some of these derelict sites in Dublin have been vacant for years

Many of these buildings could help address the current housing crisis.

Source: Click here to view the map

THE MAP ABOVE shows the various sites and properties around Dublin that are currently derelict.

These are just the sites that have been registered with the council and several have been vacant for years. Though this list in itself is substantial enough, a project last year showed the situation is actually far worse as there are many buildings that are boarded up and vacant but not on the council’s list.

Green Party councillor Ciarán Cuffe has raised the issue recently with the council, having requested details of derelict sites in his area. He said it is clear that, at a time when almost 20,000 people are on the Dublin social housing list, the “owners of these sites are prepared to wait it out and speculate” that the value will increase in the future.

Domination of the Dublin housing market by wealthy investors is playing a direct part in a housing crisis that is forcing families into homelessness. We need housing for these people now – the city can’t wait for these landlords to make a buck.

Images of the sites and buildings show they have potential to be developed and many are in thriving business or residential areas.

Source: Google Street View

Source: Google Street View

The current 3% levy on vacant sites is not acting as any kind of deterrent, the councillor said.

“My message is clear: develop the site, put a roof over someone’s head, or move on and give it to somebody who will”.

Though the direct responsibility for this problem is the council’s Cuffe said Minister Alan Kelly has it in his power to revise current levies and he should do so “without delay”.

In response to a query from TheJournal.ie, the Minister’s department said that as part of its Construction 2020 site to tackle the housing crisis, there will be a a vacant site levy and a ‘use-it-or-lose-it’ approach to planning permissions.

This levy of 3% will increase by 1% each year but would not exceed 6% of the market valuation of the site.

“In essence, the levy will entail a carrot and stick approach ie. incentivising developers to develop vacant underutilised sites while also applying lower development contribution levies on the development of such sites, and only penalising those who opt not to bring forward proposals to develop such sites.”

Read: A quarter of rental tenants in Ireland are afraid they’ll lose their home>

Read: Like Bond films? You might like to visit the derelict island from Skyfall>

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

Read next:

COMMENTS (54)