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Dublin Airport plans to introduce paid drop-off and pick-up zones after pandemic

Toll booths would be installed as part of the new system, with a free option available in one of the long-term car parks.

Image: Sam Boal/Rollingnews.ie

DUBLIN AIRPORT IS seeking planning permission to install paid drop-off and pick-up zones in a bid to reduce the number of car journeys and encourage passengers to make use of public transport.

A spokesperson for DAA said the new system would not be introduced during the Covid-19 pandemic, but works will take place shortly if the project receives approval from planning authorities. She said similar zones with charges are already in use in other airports in Ireland such as Cork and Belfast International.

Under the new system, paid drop-off and pick-up zones, with toll booths that accept tags, card and cash payments, would operate in front of Terminal 1 and Terminal 2. Currently, private cars are permitted to drop off in front of both terminals at Dublin Airport but no private vehicle pick up is permitted in these locations.

DAA said the current system has been “abused by some for several years”, with cars stopping to wait for pick-ups or circling the campus roads several times before they finally collect their party.

A free option will continue to be available in a dedicated area in the Express Red long-term car park, which has a shuttle bus service to both terminals. A new reduced fee 30-minute parking period will also be introduced in the short-term car parks.

The DAA spokesperson said revenue generated from the new system will be ring-fenced and will be invested in a series of sustainability initiatives at Dublin Airport.

These include a proposed new solar farm at Dublin Airport, the conversion of the airport’s car park and staff shuttle bus fleet from diesel to low emission vehicles, and the installation of more electric vehicle charging points at the airport’s car parks.

DAA has lodged a planning application with Fingal County Council for the required infrastructure to introduce the new system, which includes changes to the internal campus road network, new exit lanes and new barriers on the main exit road at Dublin Airport.

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“It will be more efficient to complete the construction work during the current downturn in passenger numbers, as it will have significantly less disruption on the airport road network,” the spokesperson said.

“There has already been a shift in the patterns of surface access travel to Dublin Airport in recent years, as the share of private car trips has declined significantly.

“In 2006, 44% of people used private cars to access the airport, but this had fallen to 32% by 2019. Last year, 32% of passengers made their journey to Dublin Airport by bus, while 21% took a taxi. About 6% made the journey in a hire car, while 2% of passengers used a motorbike or bicycle.

“Passengers who park and fly make two car journeys to and from Dublin Airport, but those who use a private vehicle drop off and pick up generate four separate car journeys to and from the airport.”

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