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The government wants to talk to those who are in 'energy poverty'

Submissions on a paper on energy affordability can be made until February 27.

Image: Shutterstock/baloon111

PEOPLE WHO ARE experiencing energy poverty are less likely to shop around and switch energy provider.

That’s according to a consultation paper on energy affordability published today - Towards a New Affordable Energy Strategy for Ireland.

It found that the current regulatory focus on encouraging consumers to save money by switching energy suppliers is not working for those in energy poverty.

A person who is unable to heat or power their home to an adequate degree is considered to be energy poor.

The paper wants to hear opinions on whether the energy market is working for people- particularly those in energy poverty.

Minister for Energy Alex White said, “I will be asking the Commission for Energy Regulation to ensure that the market is actually working for all consumers and to explore ways of significantly increasing the number of households that benefit from the discounts that arise from switching energy suppliers.

I am particularly concerned that people experiencing, or at risk of, energy poverty appear not to get these benefits.

“This needs to be addressed and the regulator needs to ensure that the market works for all energy consumers.”

The outcome of the energy affordability consultation will inform Minster White’s medium-term energy strategy, which will be set out in a White Paper later this year.

People are able to make submissions on the paper until February 27. E-mail: affordable.energy@dcenr.ie.

Read: Your electricity and gas bills are getting cheaper>

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