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Islamic State claims suicide-bomber attack that killed 63 people at Afghan wedding

“I will never see happiness in my life again,” the groom told a local TV station.

Relatives grieve near the near the coffins of victims of the Dubai City wedding hall.
Relatives grieve near the near the coffins of victims of the Dubai City wedding hall.
Image: AP/PA Images

Updated Aug 18th 2019, 2:24 PM

THE ISLAMIC STATE has claimed responsibility for a suicide attack on a wedding in Kabul which Afghan authorities said killed at least 63 people.

IS said one of its fighters blew himself up at a “large gathering” in Kabul while others “detonated a parked explosives-laden vehicle” when security forces arrived, in a statement posted on the Telegram messaging app.

The blast, one of the deadliest in Kabul in recent months, came as Washington and the Taliban are in the final stages of a deal to reduce the US military presence in Afghanistan.

The Taliban denied any involvement in the attack.

Interior ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi said at least 63 people had been killed and 182 wounded. “Among the wounded are women and children,” Rahimi said.

Afghanistan Wedding Hall Blast Afghans bury the bodies of victims. Source: Rafiq Maqbool

The groom recalled greeting smiling guests in the afternoon, before seeing their bodies being carried out hours later.

The attack “changed my happiness to sorrow”, the young man, who gave his name as Mirwais, told local TV station Tolo News.

“My family, my bride are in shock, they cannot even speak. My bride keeps fainting,” he said.

I lost my brother, I lost my friends, I lost my relatives. I will never see happiness in my life again.

Afghan weddings are epic and vibrant affairs, with hundreds or often thousands of guests celebrating for hours inside industrial-scale wedding halls where the men are usually segregated from the women and children.

Afghanistan Wedding Hall Blast An Afghan soldier inspects the damaged Dubai City wedding hall. Source: Rafiq Maqbool

In the aftermath of the attack, images from inside the hall showed blood-stained bodies on the ground along with pieces of flesh and torn clothes, hats, sandals and bottles of mineral water.

The wedding was believed to be a Shia gathering, with possibly 1,200 people invited. Shia Muslims are frequently targeted in Sunni-majority Afghanistan, particularly by the so-called Islamic State group, which is also active in Kabul but did not immediately issue any claim of responsibility.

Mohammad Farhag, who had been at the wedding, told AFP he had been in the women’s section when he heard a huge blast in the men’s area.

“Everyone ran outside shouting and crying,” he said.

For about 20 minutes the hall was full of smoke. Almost everyone in the men’s section is either dead or wounded.

Two hours after the blast, he said bodies were still being removed from the hall.

Afghanistan Wedding Hall Blast Source: Rafiq Maqbool

Insurgents have periodically struck Afghan weddings, which are seen as easy targets because they frequently lack rigorous security precautions.

On 12 July, at least six people were killed when a suicide bomber attacked a wedding ceremony in the eastern Afghan province of Nangarhar. IS, which has a growing footprint in the region, claimed the blast.

Expectations are rising for a deal in which the United States would start withdrawing its approximately 14,000 soldiers from Afghanistan after a two-decade war that has turned into a stalemate.

In return, the Taliban would commit to various security guarantees, including that the Islamist hardliners who long harboured Al-Qaeda would not allow Afghanistan to once again become a jihadist safe haven.

Many Afghans fear the deal could see the Taliban return to some form of power, eroding hard-won rights for women in particular, or the country descend further into a brutal civil war.

On Friday, Ahmadullah Azkhundzada, brother of Afghan Taliban leader Haibatullah Akhundzada, was among four people killed in a blast at a mosque in Pakistan’s southwestern Balochistan, a senior official with the provincial government said.

© – AFP 2019  

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