This site uses cookies to improve your experience and to provide services and advertising. By continuing to browse, you agree to the use of cookies described in our Cookies Policy. You may change your settings at any time but this may impact on the functionality of the site. To learn more see our Cookies Policy.
OK
Dublin: 10 °C Tuesday 22 October, 2019
Advertisement

This is why Google decided a childlike logo was its future

You may have noticed the change last night.

ALONGSIDE ITS REJIG of its company as Alphabet and separating it into its own entity, Google made one of the biggest changes to its logo in its 17-year history.

Chances are you’ve already seen it in action, but unlike previous changes (which were mostly refinements of what came before it), the new logo changes the typeface for a cleaner and more vibrant look.

The new look will also change the G symbol from a blue symbol to a four-colour G that matches the logo.

So it’s gone from this:

Google logo Source: Google

To this.

OGB-INSIDER-BLOGS-GoogleLogox2-Animated Source: Google

Compared to what came before it, it’s a bit of a change.

https://vine.co/v/eI3TL2PT0Zr

And as with any change, reaction to it has been mixed (but leaning more towards positive).

While the change does mark a major shift for the company, thanks to it announcing a major restructuring only a few weeks ago, the design change began early this year as its design team mentioned in its post describing the logo change.

It started when the company’s designers took part in a week-long design sprint (a period of work where a certain task or aim must be completed and ready). The aim: to redesign the Google logo.

To do this, there were four main aims.

  • To make the logo visually pop out even in small spaces.
  • Incorporating motion so the logo can adjust to any situation.
  • Make sure it fits in with all Google products (for example, Google Maps logo would require the same redesign).
  • Make the logo as ‘Googley’ as possible (make sure it has personality).

First of all, it boiled down the logo to its four main colours: blue, red, green and yellow. What then followed was hundreds of hours of design work just coming up with possible changes.

Google logo suggestions Some of the logos that were considered during the redesign. Source: Google Design

Alongside coming up with a new look, the team had to work with other groups across the company like engineering, research, product and marketing to properly test the logos.

Essentially, it boiled down into three main elements: the logotype (the general logo), dots (for loading and processing actions), and the ‘G’ (what you’ll see on mobile).

google elements logos Source: Google Design

If you first thought upon seeing the new Google logo was it looks like something you would find in a child’s schoolbook, you’re not far off.

The Google logo has always had a simple, friendly, and approachable style. We wanted to retain these qualities by combining the mathematical purity of geometric forms with the childlike simplicity of schoolbook letter printing. Our new logotype is set in a custom, geometric sans-serif typeface and maintains the multi-colored playfulness and rotated ‘e’ of our previous mark—a reminder that we’ll always be a bit unconventional.

The dots are really for loading and showing an action is being processed like Voice search, they’re more playful in how they move. Although the design and movement are very deliberate.

While their movements might seem spontaneous, their motion is rooted in consistent paths and timing, with the dots moving along geometric arcs and following a standard set of snappy easing curves.

Google mobile Source: Google Design

Google isn’t the first company to change its logo this year. Facebook made some subtle changes to its own logo earlier this year while Spotify changed the hue on its green logo to a more lime-like colour.

Read: Google is making a big move to help treat diabetes >

Read: This smartphone chip could be a big help in the fight against bad apps >

  • Share on Facebook
  • Email this article
  •  

About the author:

Quinton O'Reilly

Read next:

COMMENTS (29)