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Dublin: 14 °C Tuesday 26 May, 2020
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Is Google going to introduce a 'try before you buy' feature for apps?

The company is said to be working on a system which would allow users to download micro versions of an app before paying for it.

If Google introduces a trial mode, it will mean users will be able to test out apps and games first before paying for them.
If Google introduces a trial mode, it will mean users will be able to test out apps and games first before paying for them.
Image: Minecraft/Google Play

MOST DEVELOPERS OFFER free (or lite) versions of their apps as a way of getting users to try them first before paying, but such measures may no longer be necessary as Google is working on a trial system to help encourage more people to pay for apps.

According to a report from the Information, Google is considering ways to allow users to try out new apps without downloading them in full, which would save users time, space and data usage.

It’s believed that this approach would be more beneficial for developing markets, where users wouldn’t have as much money to spend on app downloads or in-app purchases compared to different regions.

The alleged trial feature would only provide access to specific features, meaning users would download a micro-app instead of the full version. According to the report, Google has been experimenting with the idea for more than a year.

Currently, only Windows Phone offers a trial system, allowing users to use an app for a limited amount of time or locks certain features until you pay for it.

Recently Google Play extended its refund window from 15 minutes to two hours, giving users more time to go back if they accidentally downloaded the wrong app or had problems with it.

Read: Apple delays larger iPad plans so it can make more iPhones >

Read: Google opts for Camel View to help capture Arabian desert >

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About the author:

Quinton O'Reilly

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