#Open journalism No news is bad news

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support The Journal
Dublin: 18°C Saturday 25 September 2021
Advertisement

High Court upholds challenge against cycle path trial in Sandymount

The trial would see the provision of a two-way separated cycle track along the Strand Road.

Strand Road, Dublin
Strand Road, Dublin
Image: Google Street View

THE HIGH COURT has upheld a legal challenge stopping a six-month trial of a two-way cycle path along the Strand Road in Sandymount, Dublin. 

The trial would see the provision of a two-way separated cycle track from Sean Moore Road to Merrion Gates. 

It would also see the removal of the northbound traffic lane on Strand Road to provide for a one-way southbound traffic system to make way for the cycle track. 

Local resident Peter Carvill and Dublin City Councillor Mannix Flynn had launched the Judicial Review proceedings against the council’s decision for the path. 

Dublin City Council had argued that approval from An Bord Pleanála was not required to proceed with the cycle path trial. It also argued that it could undertake the work needed using its own traffic-calming measures. 

However, Mr Justice Charles Meenan has determined that exemption from An Bord Pleanála approval does not apply as the development requires an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). 

“Thus, if the proposed cycleway is to proceed it will have to go through the planning process,” Mr Justice Meenan said in a judgement issued today. 

The matter will be listed on Monday, 9 August for the purpose of making final orders. 

Commenting on the decision, Green Party Councillor for the Pembroke Area Hazel Chu said she is “deeply disappointed”. 

“The importance of providing safe, sustainable transport and a vision for Dublin where people of all ages and abilities choose to cycle as part of their everyday life cannot be underestimated,” Chu said. 

“This cycle path had the opportunity to enable thousands of people to choose cycling as their primary mode of transport for community, getting to school and college, getting into town or simply going to the beach or visiting Dublin Bay’s many coastal attractions,” she said. 

Chu added that she will “continue to work with our council transport section and other authorities to build for a better, safer and more sustainable future for all”. 

Dublin Cycling Campaign has also expressed its disappointment at the judgement. 

“We’re bitterly disappointed by this outcome,” Dublin Cycling Campaign chairperson Kevin Baker said. 

#Open journalism No news is bad news Support The Journal

Your contributions will help us continue to deliver the stories that are important to you

Support us now

“It is a lost opportunity to trial an amenity which would have enabled people of all ages and abilities to safely and comfortably cycle along the seafront on Strand Road.”

The decision was welcomed by the STC (Serpentine Ave, Tritonville and Claremont Roads) residents’ group.

The local group said the proposed scheme would have resulted in major changes to traffic patterns in the area and would have had serious implications for residents, businesses, schools and sports clubs in the Dublin 4 vicinity.

“Sandymount is pro-cycling and we welcome improved cycling infrastructure in our village,” a spokesperson for the group said.

“What we did not want was significant traffic displacement in the Sandymount area, rendering other, smaller roads busier and causing increased risks for pedestrians, children and local cyclists. The DCC proposal would have brought this about,” they added.

Read next:

COMMENTS (63)

This is YOUR comments community. Stay civil, stay constructive, stay on topic. Please familiarise yourself with our comments policy here before taking part.
write a comment

    Leave a commentcancel