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Residents at disability centre spat at and under constant threat of aggression

An inspection from Hiqa found a number of issues at Broadleaf Manor in Kildare.

Image: Shutterstock/sylv1rob1

A DISABILITY CENTRE in Kildare “failed in ensuring that residents were safe”, according to a report from the Health Information and Quality Authority (Hiqa).

Residents at Broadleaf Manor, run by Nua Healthcare Services,  would be subject to “verbal aggressions and attempted physical aggression” daily, Hiqa inspectors said.

Inspectors said that the staff at the centre did not have the sufficient knowledge necessary to support residents and deal with challenging behaviours.

They said: “A resident submitted a complaint to the provider stating that they felt the centre was no longer their home and that they cannot eat anymore.

Residents had been spat at by other residents. On one occasion, a resident was directed by staff to go outside for a cigarette to protect them from assault from a peer. This was in the middle of the night.

As a result of these aggressive behaviours, there was a high level of physical restraint at the centre, with at least one incidence a day.

Over 10 weeks, there were 78 physical restraints recorded. On one occasion, a resident was restrained for a total of 40 minutes.

Inspectors said: “[We] found that all efforts had not been made to identify and alleviate the cause of residents’ behaviours.

There was a focus on training of breakaway techniques and physical restraint. This resulted in physical restraint being the primary intervention.

In response to the inspectors’ report, Nua Healthcare detailed a number of measures it would take to ensure residents are protected.

Inspections of other services said that improvements were required by centres operated by Muiríosa Foundation, Stewarts Care and Camphill Communities of Ireland.

The full range of Hiqa reports can be found here.

Read: Elderly people forced to wait over 24 hours in emergency departments of these 25 hospitals

Read: Some foster carers in Kerry, Galway and Roscommon are not being vetted enough

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Sean Murray

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