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Jimmy Devins to retire at next election

The Sligo-North Leitrim TD – who gave up the Fianna Fáil whip over cuts to cancer services – won’t run again.

Jimmy Devins speaks at a protest against health cuts in 2007. He later quit the Fianna Fáil parliamentary party.
Jimmy Devins speaks at a protest against health cuts in 2007. He later quit the Fianna Fáil parliamentary party.
Image: Niall Carson/PA Archive

WHIPLESS FIANNA FÁIL TD Jimmy Devins has announced his intention to retire from politics at the next general election, bringing to 26 the number of current TDs who will not be running next time out.

The TD for Sligo-North Leitrim this evening said he had decided to end his political career after talking with his family, friends and supporters.

Devins, who was first elected to the Dáil in 2002, was appointed junior minister with special responsibility for Disability Issues and Mental Health in 2007.

In the cabinet reshuffle following the elevation of Brian Cowen to the Taoiseach’s office, he became junior minister with special responsibility for science, technology and innovation. He lost that position in 2009, however, when the number of junior ministries was cut from 20 to 15.

A doctor by profession, Devins had resigned the Fianna Fáil whip in 2009, along with constituency and party mate Eamon Scanlon, in protest at the removal of breast cancer screening and treatment services at the general hospital in Sligo.

He and Scanlon had both remained outside the Fianna Fáil party, though both had continued to vote on the government’s site in any Dáil divisions.

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Gavan Reilly

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