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'No more war' - North and South Korean leaders commit to complete denuclearisation

Kim was flanked by his sister and close adviser Kim Yo Jong.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, prepares to shake hands with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the border village of Panmunjom.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, prepares to shake hands with South Korean President Moon Jae-in at the border village of Panmunjom.
Image: AP

Updated at 10.40am

NORTH KOREAN LEADER Kim Jong Un and the South’s President Moon Jae-in held a historic summit today where they committed to the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula.

“South and North Korea confirmed the common goal of realising, through complete denuclearisation, a nuclear-free Korean peninsula,” they said in a joint statement.

The leaders embraced warmly after signing the statement in which they declared “there will be no more war on the Korean Peninsula”.

Kim promised to ensure that the agreement would be implemented, unlike previous pledges.

The two Koreas will closely co-ordinate to ensure they did not “repeat the unfortunate history in which past inter-Korea agreements…fizzled out after beginning,” Kim said after the simmit.

There may be backlash, hardship and frustration on our way… but a victory cannot be achieved without pain.

Kim said he was “filled with emotion” after stepping over concrete blocks, making him the first North Korean leader to set foot in the South since the Korean War ended in an armistice 65 years ago.

At Kim’s impromptu invitation the two men briefly crossed hand-in-hand into the North before walking to the Peace House building on the southern side of the truce village of Panmunjom for the summit — only the third of its kind since hostilities ceased in 1953.

“I came here determined to send a starting signal at the threshold of a new history,” said Kim, whose nuclear-armed regime is accused of widespread human rights abuses.

With the North’s atomic arsenal high on the agenda, Moon responded that he hoped they would reach “a bold agreement so that we may give a big gift to the whole Korean people and the people who want peace”.

Entourages

Kim was flanked by his sister and close adviser Kim Yo Jong and the North’s head of inter-Korean relations, while Moon was accompanied by his spy chief and chief of staff.

It is the highest-level encounter yet in a whirlwind of nuclear diplomacy, and intended to pave the way for a much-anticipated encounter between Kim and US President Donald Trump.

The North’s official KCNA news agency said that Kim will “open-heartedly discuss… all the issues arising in improving inter-Korean relations and achieving peace, prosperity and reunification of the Korean peninsula”.

But it did not mention denuclearisation, and as images of the leaders’ handshake were beamed around the world, the North’s state television showed only a test card.

Last year Pyongyang carried out its sixth nuclear blast, by far its most powerful to date, and launched missiles capable of reaching the US mainland.

Its actions sent tensions soaring as Kim and Trump traded personal insults and threats of war.

Moon seized on the South’s Winter Olympics as an opportunity to broker dialogue between them, and has said his meeting with Kim will serve to set up the summit between Pyongyang and Washington.

The White House said in a statement that it hoped the summit would “achieve progress toward a future of peace and prosperity for the entire Korean Peninsula”.

Trump has demanded the North give up its weapons, and Washington is pressing for it to do so in a complete, verifiable and irreversible way.

But Seoul played down expectations Thursday, saying the North’s technological advances with its nuclear and missile programmes meant any deal would be “fundamentally different in nature from denuclearisation agreements in 1990s and early 2000s”.

“That’s what makes this summit all the more difficult,” the chief of the South’s presidential secretariat Im Jong-seok told reporters.

 © – AFP 2018

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