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The Explainer: Professor Philip Nolan on what the numbers are telling us about Covid-19 right now

We speak to the NPHET member and chair of the Irish Epidemiological Modelling Advisory Group.

AS CHAIR OF the Irish Epidemiological Modelling Advisory Group and NPHET’s modelling expert, Professor Philip Nolan is at the forefront of examining what’s happening with the spread of Covid-19.

We’re into the second wave of the pandemic, and so there are lots of numbers flying about – details around case numbers, vaccine efficiency, and numbers of tests, for example.

With Ireland now almost a month into Level 5 restrictions -  which were introduced due to a second – NPHET is paying close attention to what the numbers are telling us.

This is particularly important right now, as the case numbers have not been going down in the last week or so. 

This week, we interviewed Philip Nolan for the podcast to find out more about what the numbers tell us. He discussed the direction the five-day moving average is taking, whether it’s too early to talk about Christmas, how the second wave compared to the first, and what the learnings were from the first wave.

It’s an essential listen to get a hold on what exactly is happening with Covid-19 rates right now. 

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Source: The Explainer/SoundCloud

This episode was put together by presenter Sinéad O’Carroll, executive producer Christine Bohan  producer Aoife Barry, producer and technical operator Nicky Ryan.

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