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Photo apps are in a rut, but these two might shake things up a bit

And one of them is from Polaroid (remember it?)

WHILE IT’S STILL summertime, you might be taking more photos than usual but if you’re getting bored with the usual offerings, there are two new photo apps that might rejuvenate your interest.

One of the first ones is Prisma, an iOS app that turns your normal photos into something you would find in an art museum.

More than likely, chances are you’re probably sick of every photo app taking inspiration from Instagram and applying filters to everything, but consider this an exception.

Prisma uses a mixture of neural networks and artificial intelligence to turn your photos into artwork. So you can turn a photo like this:

DSC_0053

Into something like this:

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Or this:

IMG_1822

It takes a few seconds for a filter to analyse a photo and apply its effect, but if you feel the change is too strong, you can reduce the filter effect.

The app is iOS only but an Android version will be launched later this month and you will soon be able to do the same thing with video.

The other photo app, taking some inspiration from the likes of Apple’s Live Photos, comes from the camera company Polaroid called Swing.

Another iOS app (sorry Android users, but there is a version in the works apparently), it lets you capture one second silent clips which you can play by dragging your finger across or tilting your phone.

IMG_1825

Speaking of short clips and Live Photos, you can also download Motion Stills from Google which removes the shakiness from your iPhone’s Live Photos.

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About the author:

Quinton O'Reilly

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