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This is what is being done to allow Ireland to build more houses

A review into An Bord Pleanála’s is taking place and should be finished by the end of the year.

Image: Shutterstock/Snvv

A REVIEW IS set to take place of the Irish planning board, An Bord Pleanála, to allow it to “meet future challenges”.

This comes with ever increasing activity in the construction sector, something that will increase the number of planning applications and appeals.

The review will look at how to deal with this as well as a number of other areas of potential improvement.

This includes plans to look at how EU legislation impacts on planning in Ireland; how the Board will deal with an increase in its functions; the administrative practices being used by the board and; how it can achieve an optimal organisational structure.

What is the board responsible for?

An Bord Pleanála operates as an independent body and is responsible for ruling on planning appeals.

In recent times it has also become more involved in assessing and determining applications for infrastructure developments including roads and railways.

It also plays a role in mediating the compulsory acquisition of land by local authorities.

What is going to happen now?

The review is set to take around six months with the aim of producing a report and this will then being submitted to the Minister for the Environment by the end of 2015.

The review group will be chaired by London-based Gregory Jones QC who specialises in town & country planning, environmental, European and compulsory purchase law.

Speaking about the changes, Environment Minister Alan Kelly, said, “I consider that now is an opportune time to undertake an organisational review to ensure that it is appropriately positioned for the future.”

Read: 20 mad photos of international borders from around the world

Also: The Filan family are getting into politics

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