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Dublin: 12 °C Saturday 17 November, 2018
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TDs get a pay rise totalling nearly €1k today

The pay boost comes under the Public Service Stability Agreement which aims to restore public servant wages.

Image: Shutterstock/BATMANV

TDS WILL BE happy when they look at their pay packets, as today they are receiving nearly a €1,000 pay boost under the Public Service Stability Agreement (PSSA).

The agreement sets out how Fempi measures – which were introduced during economic hardship – will be unwound and how wages for public sector workers will be increased between now and 2022. 

The deal also sets out that there will be no pay increases for the Taoiseach, Tánaiste, Ministers, Ministers of State or the Attorney General. 

However, TDs will see their pay packet rise from €93,599 to €94,535 from today.

This is the second 1% rise politicians have received in 2018, having already received on in January. 

Whether TDs want to accept the wage increase “is a matter for them”, Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe said previously. 

TDs are just one segment of the civil service who are getting pay restoration under the deal, with more than 300,000 government employees benefiting. 

A total of 90% of pay restoration promised is by 2020, with the deal costing the government €887 million over three years. 

A number of TDs, such as Fine Gael’s Noel Rock, have said they will forego the pay hike.

Rock confirmed to TheJournal.ie that his position remains the same, stating that “until we get to the point where there’s full pay restoration for guards, nurses, and teachers my age, my position remains unchanged”.

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