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Fancy red carpet to be put down on Ha'penny Bridge to mark 200 years

Relatives of the bridge’s designer and the man who commissioned it will take part in a ceremony later today.

shutterstock_133880780 (1) Source: Shutterstock/littleny

IT’S THE arching glory at the centre of Dublin, and today the Ha’penny Bridge will turn 200.

The structure has been helping Dubliners cross the River Liffey since 1816, and still looks pretty much the same as it did when it was built in Georgian Dublin.

The bridge, as anyone in the know will tell you, is officially called the ‘Liffey Bridge’ – but took on its adopted name due to the halfpenny toll that was in place for the first hundred years of its existence.

To mark the occasion, Dublin City Council is pulling out all the stops – and a ceremonial crossing of the bridge ceremony is scheduled for later today.

So what’s happening today?

In honour of its birthday, the bridge will be dressed with a fancy red carpet and floral display.

shutterstock_63402568 Source: Shutterstock/Tyler Olson

Relatives of former Lord Mayor John Claudius Beresford, the guy who commissioned the bridge, and John Windsor, the engineer who designed it, will also be putting in an appearance.

“At the time, it was at the forefront of technology and would have been a statement that Dublin was a forward looking city,” said David Windsor, great-grandson of designer John.

I’m grateful that the people of, and visitors to Dublin have taken it to their hearts and that the city of Dublin has cared for it for future generations to use and admire.

Back when the bridge was first built it was to take the place the ferry that had been used to get the city’s residents from one side of the river to the other.

Around the turn of this century, the structure was looking a bit shaky, and in 2001 a major restoration project was undertaken.

The €1.8 million restoration saw the bridge restored to its full glory.

The north-south bridge crossing will take place at 12.30pm today.

Read: These lads used Dublin as a jungle gym, got caught by the Gardaí, and filmed it all

Also: Here’s the new plan to stop people putting love locks on the Ha’penny Bridge

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